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150/35 Fios: Not getting proper speeds. (40-80Mbs)

150/35 Fios: Not getting proper speeds. (40-80Mbs)

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Contributor GHirsch76
Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-11-2012
Message 1 of 12
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Im about 3 weeks into my Verizon service. Ive been experienceing non-stop problems with my 150/35 Fios service. Similarly the last time I had Verizon's 50/50 service I had the same problem which didnt get corrected for 2 months. My issue is im averaging 40-80 mbit down instead of 150. Speeds are measured from http://my.verizon.com/micro/speedtest/broadband/, speedtest.net and personal data transfers. I placed at least 5 trouble tickets for this issue since. Ive run the PC Optimization which seemed to fix the problem temporarily. Verizon had also restarted my ONT which also fixed the problem for a day. Next a rep had me reset the router and test speeds with just computer plugged in with a wired connection to the router. I have tried multiple computers all with the same result. Regardless of what is done the issue keeps reoccuring. 

 

Could someone please advise where to go from here?

11 REPLIES 11
Moderator Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2,011
Registered: ‎03-10-2011
Message 2 of 12
(15,497 Views)

I'm sorry you are having difficulty. An agent with access to your account will reach out to you directly by email, private message in the Forums and/or the billing telephone number on your Verizon account for more information or to help you resolve your issue.

Platinum Contributor III Platinum Contributor III
Platinum Contributor III
Posts: 7,357
Registered: ‎12-15-2010
Message 3 of 12
(15,461 Views)

I just wanted to make sure, but...

 

When you had the 150Mbps service installed, did a Verizon tech show up and replace your ONT? What model of ONT are you currently using? I'm asking this because if you happen to be on a BPON ONT, they should have never provisioned you at such a speed. You need to be on GPON.

 

Second, you have checked the speed against other services, such as a really fast download mirror, Usenet or P2P download right? The Verizon speed test servers in some regions do seem to be hit or miss with the results they return back, so that's another point worth making.

 

Lastly, is the drop in speed accumpanied by an increase in latency at all, or in an increase in packet loss or jitter?

Contributor Cynar
Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎02-23-2012
Message 4 of 12
(15,362 Views)

Dear Sir,

 

     After spending about an hour or so searching Verizon, I found this blog thing here and spent a good amount of time reading almost the whole thing.  Wow lots of information but I still need some help.  You seemed not to be concerned with should I or shouldn't I buy Verizon, and I just need an answer which I think is not that hard.

 

     I'm a disable retired Police Officer and I have messed around with computers, video games, etc. for as long as I can remember.  The thing is that I taught myself almost everything and didn't go to school for computers so sometimes it takes me awhile to understand something.  Plus I have memory problems which creates some fun at times. LOL

 

     Anyway I pay Verizon for the 35/35 thingie.  But I was trying to find out if "since they didn't change my router am I wasting money? Or should they have offered a different router?" Now the router thing appears to be "I should just go buy a wireless N to speed things up, because Verizon doesn't look like they want me to have an N router."  That being said I was also looking at hard wiring the 2 xbox's in our house that are closest, then buying an N router or at least a booster.

 

     So what I'm asking is buy buying the 35/35 am I wasting my money without a wireless N router?  Also since my xbox's seem to be interferred with I was going to buy a booster, or would buying a N router boost things enough?  I hope I was able to explain this well enough, and I hope to hear from you soon.

 

Thanks,

Steve

(Cynar)

Copper Contributor MattinNJ
Copper Contributor
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎02-25-2012
Message 5 of 12
(15,309 Views)

Did you ever resolve your issue?  Can you get verified 150Mbps download?

 

If so, good... if not, read on... yes it's a long post... but should give you the results you pay for.

 

First thing... you will NOT get 150Mbps download using any wireless configuration.  To get 150Mbps you must be

wired.

 

So if you are wired, then the first thing you need to check is your ethernet cables.  For the FiOS 150/35 plan,

you need at least a Cat 5e class ethernet cable going from the FiOS router to your computer.  You may have a Cat

5 cable (notice no little 'e' after the '5') which may/may not work for some installations, since a finicky 'auto

sensing' ethernet card may not recognize the 'gigabit' or '1000' signal the FiOS router sends down the cable. 

Cat 5e ethernet cables do not inhibit the 'gigabit' or 1000' signal, permitting the ethernet card to 'auto sense'

the higher bandwidth and automatically adjust the cards settings appropriately to the gigabit / 1000 speeds.

 

To check if you have a Cat 5 or Cat 5e cable, just look at the outer casing on the ethernet cable.  The class

rating must be stamped on the entire length of the cable.  It's as easy as literally looking for 'Cat 5' or 'Cat

5e' printed on the cable.

 

If you have a Cat 5 cable, replace it with a Cat 5e, Cat 6, or Cat 6a ethernet cable.  Amazon has the lowest

prices but be sure to read the reviews for each cable before you buy, since some are knock-offs and lesser

quality.  Just search Amazon for "Cat 5e ethernet cable".

 

Second thing you need is a gigabit ethernet card.  The Verizon installers should certainly confirm this... or at

least inform you that you will have to upgrade your card.  If your computer is older than 2 or 3 years, there is

a good chance you only have a 10/100Mbps ethernet card... which will max out any FiOS connection up to the limit

of the card, which is 100Mbps... but you'll generally see in the 75-78Mbps range for download speed.

 

I don't know how tech savvy you are, but it's fairly straightforward to check your ethernet card.  Assuming you

have a Windows operating system, navigate to 'Device Manager', then click the triangle next to 'Network

adapters'.  If the description of the card contains '10/100' or 'Fast Ethernet' then you do not have a gigabit

ethernet card.  If the description of the card contains 'gigabit', 'GBE', '10/100/1000' (note the 1000), 1.0

Gbps, or similar description, then you have a gigabit capable card.

 

If you think you have a gigabit ethernet card, and you haven't replaced the Cat 5 cable with a Cat 5e cable, the

gigabit card may not 'recognize' the gigabit speeds and 'turn on' the necessary settings in the adapter.  So

replace the cable with Cat 5e.

 

If you have a Cat 5e cable... and you think you have a gigabit ethernet card... then you'll have to check some

properties of the ethernet card.  Again, navigate to 'Device Manager', click the triangle next to 'Network

adapters', right click the description of the ethernet card, then click on properties.  Now in the properties

window, click on the 'Advanced' tab,  in the 'Property' list, click on 'Speed & Duplex' or something similar to

this 'speed' description.  In the 'Value' box on the right, you will probably see 'Auto Negotiation' or 'Auto

Sensing'.  Open up the 'value' dropdown box, look for reference to '1000Mbps FD', '1000 Mbps Full Duplex', or

'1.0 Gbps Full Duplex'.  If you do not see these values and only see values up to '100', then your card is not

getting the signal that you are now on a gigabit connection.  Do not change the 'value' and just click on

'Cancel' to close the ethernet card properties window.  (See below for next steps.)  If you are lucky and see one

of the '1000' or '1.0 Gbps' FD or Full Duplex values, then click on the value... then 'OK' on the ethernet card properties window. 

You'll lose internet connection for a few seconds, then once you are back online, check your download speed.  I

hope this is as far as you have to go and have the full 150Mbps download speed.  If not, read on.

 

If you do not have a gigabit ethernet card (or have one that doesn't provide gigabit functionaltiy), you will

need to install a new gigabit ethernet card.  The first step in this process is to determine if your computer has

PCI or PCI-express expansion slots... AND that one of them is available.  (Helpful note, if you don't have a free

PCI/PCI-e slot, look at the back of your computer for a telephone jack that lines up with one of the PCI/PCI-e

slots.  This is your telephone/fax modem that you've probably never used anyway... so you'll be able to remove

this card and use the slot for your new gigabit ethernet card).

 

I have found the best prices (or close to best prices without actually having to go to a retail store) for these cards are on Amazon... so seach for 'gigabit ethernet card' and ensure you get the right type, PCI, PCI-e, or PCI Express (PCI-e and PCI Express are the same).

 

My opinion is to go with Intel:
   Great PCI-e card, around $34.00 on Amazon:
      Intel Gigabit CT PCI-E Network Adapter EXPI9301CTBLK (bulk)
 
   Great PCI card, around $35.00 on Amazon:
      Intel PWLA8391GT PRO/1000 GT PCI Network Adapter

 

These cards are very easy to install especially if you use Windows.  Easiest way to install is to leave your

'old' ethernet card in place with your 'new' Cat 5e ethernet cable plugged into, shut down your PC, open up the

PC case, find an empty PCI or PCI-e slot, insert the new ethernet card without plugging in any ethernet cables.

Turn on computer and let Windows do its magic and find the latest drivers for the new card automatically (via

internet through your 'old' ethernet card).  Once the driver install finishes for the new card, unplug the Cat 5e

ethernet cable from the 'old' card and plug it into the newly installed card.  After about 30 seconds while

Windows configures the new card, you'll be online.  No need to install any additional drivers via disc or

otherwise.

 

You should now see 150Mbps download speeds.

 

While your at it, you should replace all of your other ethernet cables with at least Cat 5e class cables to fully

appreciate the faster speeds.

Copper Contributor gccradioscience
Copper Contributor
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎02-14-2012
Message 6 of 12
(14,681 Views)

 

I signed up for the 150/64 package and found out I was using the WiFI connection so I started using the Ethernet connection, but my card was one those T-100 based cards, but when I put in one of those 10/100 PCI cards my speeds came up via Ethernet @

95.24 Mbps downloads and 69.16 Mbps uploads, BUT I am not getting 150 Mbps/75 Mbps speeds.    So I am shopping around or T-1000 based cards.   I wish that my apartment had a pass through outlet for the ethernet cable to connect directly to the bedroom PC.   When will they ever get WiFi routers to be at these speeds?  

Platinum Contributor III Platinum Contributor III
Platinum Contributor III
Posts: 7,357
Registered: ‎12-15-2010
Message 7 of 12
(14,673 Views)

@gccradioscience wrote:

 

I signed up for the 150/64 package and found out I was using the WiFI connection so I started using the Ethernet connection, but my card was one those T-100 based cards, but when I put in one of those 10/100 PCI cards my speeds came up via Ethernet @

95.24 Mbps downloads and 69.16 Mbps uploads, BUT I am not getting 150 Mbps/75 Mbps speeds.    So I am shopping around or T-1000 based cards.   I wish that my apartment had a pass through outlet for the ethernet cable to connect directly to the bedroom PC.   When will they ever get WiFi routers to be at these speeds?  


Wireless N can kinda sorta do it on 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz (more likely). You just need gear capable of running at 300Mbps or 450Mbps on both ends (meaning, quality radios and antennas). 802.11ac (Wireless AC) is being designed to handle Gigabits theoretically, however it will only operate on 5Ghz bonding far more channels than N is designed to do so until they do something about the range, expect a sharp speed curve. I haven't seen this in action so I don't know how well the draft hardware operates. I certainly hope they don't botch it up like they did with Wireless N however.

Contributor NetAdmin-Nat
Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎12-07-2012
Message 8 of 12
(14,085 Views)

I was given the Actiontec MI424WR-GEN3I which does not seem to have any gig ports to connect to.  What router did they install for you that gave you 1000 mbps ports? 

Platinum Contributor III Platinum Contributor III
Platinum Contributor III
Posts: 7,357
Registered: ‎12-15-2010
Message 9 of 12
(14,081 Views)

@NetAdmin-Nat wrote:

I was given the Actiontec MI424WR-GEN3I which does not seem to have any gig ports to connect to.  What router did they install for you that gave you 1000 mbps ports? 

 

This response is for this post sorry.


All of the Gen3 devices have Gigabit ports on them. It should say "GigE" on it as well if it is a Rev. I. Gen to if my memory serves, includes Rev F and E. Gen1 is Rev. D to Rev A. 

Platinum Contributor I
Platinum Contributor I
Posts: 6,819
Registered: ‎08-23-2008
Message 10 of 12
(14,071 Views)

@NetAdmin-Nat wrote:

I was given the Actiontec MI424WR-GEN3I which does not seem to have any gig ports to connect to.  What router did they install for you that gave you 1000 mbps ports? 



If you subscribed to anything above 75/35, you should have been provided this router. (150/65)
https://teleproducts.verizon.com/fileshare/plm/brochure/ATGIGEBHR_brochure.pdf
If you want the new router and do not have the 150/65 service, it is available for purchase.
https://teleproducts.verizon.com/fios/index.cfm/eh/DisplayDetails
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