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Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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Bronze Contributor II
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Registered: ‎07-20-2009

Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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This may sound like a dumb question, but I've been bitten before by upgrading software or equipment and missed some gotcha and ended up worse off.

Problem I want to solve is slow/weak internet (old home with thick lath and plaster walls, and lots of walls!).

What I have now is Router Westell A90-9100EM-10, 25/25 internet. Wireless devices include iphone 5/ipad and iPad mini (iPads support wireless N), Amazon FireTV and a wireless HP printer. Streaming music sometimes stutters, and I haven't yet tried to stream video (just got the FireTv yesterday). No game players here, and not likely more than streaming plus an iOS device working concurrently. (Probably tmi, but in case anything is relevant, wdik?)

I'm thinking moving to Quantum Gateway should improve things (noticed the other N capable router, but price not much less). Any reason I wouldn't want to do this? Thank you in advance.
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Bronze Contributor II
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Registered: ‎07-27-2011

Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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I'm hoping this means that I could just add a splitter or something to the cable that runs into my stb in the living room.

 

Yes, that's exactly how the Extender works. It comes with its own splitter. You take the cable from your TV and put it into the splitter. It has one coax in and 2 out.  One of the out coaxes goes to the extender, the other goes to your TV.  That's it.

 

The FIOS cable coming into your house has 3 signals on it: phone, TV, and Internet. The ONT box separates the signals onto whatever kinds of cabling your house has.  Phone (standard analog voice) goes to the copper phone cables in your walls, TV goes to coax, and Internet goes to either coax or Cat5 cable if that's what you have.  Most homes use coax for everything, including Digital Voice which is really Internet traffic.

 

Your router & extender pick off the Internet signal from the coax just like your TV picks off the TV signal.  

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Bronze Contributor II
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Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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Just adding status from today - Amazon Fire TV audio streaming worked beautifully (I changed nothing). I do live in. A very dense neighborhood and my devices see many networks. Maybe Neighbors offline on Sundays.
But still, my issue isn't just with new streaming tasks, my wifi signal in many areas of my home is very weak (single story 1400 sq ft). Mostly I think due to the many thick walls and undesirable location of router (but it has to be next to the computer, so I can't see any reasonable way to relocate the router)
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Bronze Contributor II
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Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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Try the Verizon FIOS Netowrk Extender.  It works very well and is virtually plug & play.  Lst time I checked they were $75 which is what I paid for mine.

 

https://teleproducts.verizon.com/fios/index.cfm/eh/DisplayDetails

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Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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try buying 1 or more old verizon on router/s on ebay and coax connect them where you have weak signal.  After bridging it to your main router you will have a cheap extender in place with the added capability of 4 hard wired ports.

 

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Bronze Contributor II
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Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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Wouldn't either of the two suggestions above (extender or adding another router) require physical cable (coax?) installation? I do have a FiOS connection in my living room, center core of house (plus the one at the far corner room where my current router and computer are located). Can I use a splitter on that living room cable that goes into my FiOS box?
As you can tell I know nothin' about hardware nor networking. I can bake a great pie though!
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Bronze Contributor II
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Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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Yes, you need a coax cable to plug into the back of either the Extender or another router.  The Extender comes with it's own splitter and another piece of coax so you can also hook up your TV. The Extender also has 2 standard Ethernet ports which are great if you have a game console or any other Internet device near your TV.  In that case you can switch that device from WiFi to wired and get much better performance out of it.

 

The Extender also has the advantage of being a bridge, which is not the same as a router.  As previously noted, a used router would likely be cheaper and would also work, but you'd have to change it's function to bridging instead of routing. Other wise it will conflict with your current router and stop your whole network from working.

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Bronze Contributor II
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Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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@bbinnard wrote:

Yes, you need a coax cable to plug into the back of either the Extender or another router.  The Extender comes with it's own splitter and another piece of coax so you can also hook up your TV. The Extender also has 2 standard Ethernet ports which are great if you have a game console or any other Internet device near your TV.  In that case you can switch that device from WiFi to wired and get much better performance out of it.

 

The Extender also has the advantage of being a bridge, which is not the same as a router.  As previously noted, a used router would likely be cheaper and would also work, but you'd have to change it's function to bridging instead of routing. Other wise it will conflict with your current router and stop your whole network from working.


re: coax cable plug into the back of extender or router -- it's the other end I'm concerned about. I'm assuming it needs to be connected to my existing router somewhere/somehow. Obviously stringing a coax cable from room to room isn't feasible (definitely a tripping hazard for this senior lady, lol!)

And yes, definitely would like to have ethernet port available in my living room, in particular for my new Amazon Fire TV.

 

Underlying problem is that I don't understand what cabling I actually have (that connects my router and tv and ONT)  and need to know more about that. I just found this link in another thread and will take some time to study; good link!

 

Also - I don't want to lose track of whether I should upgrade my original router to one that supports wireless N, seems like a good idea even if I solve dead/weak areas with addition of an extender or extra router (I do see those old routers in thrift stores often these days).

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Bronze Contributor II
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Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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Look atthe back of your current router.  If it has a coax cable going into it then you should be all set.  If it has only Ethernet cables you'll need to talk to Verizon to sort things out.

 

PS: Coax cables have round connectors; Ethernet cable have connectors that look like phone plugs (but they really aren't.)

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Bronze Contributor II
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Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

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@bbinnard wrote:

Look atthe back of your current router.  If it has a coax cable going into it then you should be all set.  If it has only Ethernet cables you'll need to talk to Verizon to sort things out.

 

PS: Coax cables have round connectors; Ethernet cable have connectors that look like phone plugs (but they really aren't.)


Input looks like coax (a heavy black unmarked cable).

But --- what does that mean in terms of how I would incorporate a second router or an extender into my home system? I'm hoping this means that I could just add a splitter or something to the cable that runs into my stb in the living room.

 

I just checked FiOS stb input connection and it is RG6 coax.

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Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 169
Registered: ‎07-27-2011

Re: Any reason I shouldn't upgrade to Quantum Gateway router?

Message 10 of 18
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I'm hoping this means that I could just add a splitter or something to the cable that runs into my stb in the living room.

 

Yes, that's exactly how the Extender works. It comes with its own splitter. You take the cable from your TV and put it into the splitter. It has one coax in and 2 out.  One of the out coaxes goes to the extender, the other goes to your TV.  That's it.

 

The FIOS cable coming into your house has 3 signals on it: phone, TV, and Internet. The ONT box separates the signals onto whatever kinds of cabling your house has.  Phone (standard analog voice) goes to the copper phone cables in your walls, TV goes to coax, and Internet goes to either coax or Cat5 cable if that's what you have.  Most homes use coax for everything, including Digital Voice which is really Internet traffic.

 

Your router & extender pick off the Internet signal from the coax just like your TV picks off the TV signal.  

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