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FIOS Ethernet not working, Wireless works fine.

FIOS Ethernet not working, Wireless works fine.

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Gold Contributor V
Gold Contributor V
Posts: 1,692
Registered: ‎05-17-2009
Message 21 of 33
(24,699 Views)

also on the computers that dont work, do they even pull IP's?

 

can you ping the router from the non working computers. Can they ping out via IP? Via domain?




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Error exists between keyboard and chair.
Gold Contributor VII Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 1,953
Registered: ‎05-27-2010
Message 22 of 33
(24,671 Views)

From earlier on in the thread ... the "limited connectivity" message, that would imply the network card is seeing link, but not getting a DHCP to succeed.    Having gone thru a variety of configuration tests on the modem/switch and confirming other computers on the switch aren't having issues ... I suspect we're dealing with a firewall block on the client PC. 

 

Since it's stated that wireless works ... I would have thought the firewall would already be configured to allow the 192.168.1.x network in as a trusted network.  But perhaps it's interface specific in this case.

 

Interesting thought just occurred to me ... can you turn OFF the wireless connection before you connect via the ethernet cable?  Can't imagine that's doing anything, but easy enough to try.  If that doesn't work, maybe going thru the network setup again using the wizard (varies depending on which OS we're talking here) might trip the setting that's giving you grief.   Normally I don't use the wizard to do the configuration, but in this case it might actually help.

 

Short of actually seeing what's going on on the machine, I';m not sure where else to go with it ...

Copper Contributor ShankedS
Copper Contributor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
Message 23 of 33
(24,637 Views)

So, yes. I took the cable from the computer that was working and used it on the Desktop and the Laptop, it didn't work. So I moved my entire operation downstairs and tried hooking the Desktop up directly to the Router but it didn't work. I tried updating the ethernet drivers using the other computer that worked to download them, that didn't do anything (I had previously tried uninstalling and reinstalling the current drivers). Finally, I opened the machine up and did a hard reset on the motherboard by disconnecting it from the power supply... nothing.

 

On the Windows 7 machine (Desktop) there should be no firewalls up that I know about. I turned off Windows Defender (this was after it stopped working, I did it to remove any possible firewalls, so it being off is NOT the issue), and uninstalled any programs that I knew of that might be a firewall. If you know of any other firewalls built into 7 that I might check, please do let me know.

 

On my Laptop I removed the big firewall, but, there's still some Anti-Virus stuff and possibly some built in XP firewalls I could check. But what's odd is that the computer that works has firewalls and it works just fine. Furthermore, for the computers that don't work, they worked the last time I was home (a couple months ago) with all of the firewall settings up.

 

And no, they aren't getting IPs. As mentioned, the Desktop which has no wireless whatsoever (which is why it's crucial that it get an ethernet connection) can't even see the router even though it says it's connected to something locally, all it sees is itself. Giving an "Unidentified" network.

 

Your guy's patience has been outstanding and you've kept me calm through this, I know that it's VERY frustrating. The fact that the ethernet did work on the Desktop for a brief period makes me highly suspect that this isn't a hardware, and is, in fact, a software issue. The obvious culprit would be a firewall, which could explain the brief times of working, maybe something passed, itl et it through, and then it failed and blocked it again. But, if that's the case, I may need some help finding any built in firewalls that I know nothing about.

 

Something else that occured to me. With the old router, when I reset it, that was when my ethernet worked the longest. I know the router has a firewall in it, maybe that's doing something? But the default settings shouldn't keep anything out, no? I'm not even sure what might clue me off that the settings are blocking something, the General setting is "Typical (Medium)" which, to my knowledge, shouldn't be blocking the computers. Maybe something else in the router settings is causing it?

 

One possible test I'd like to do but don't have the means to do right this second is to see if these computers connect to another network. That would put the conflict as a possible interaction between the computer and the router, which would point to firewall issues.

 

Your help is appreciated. I'm close to ripping out my hair, personally.

Gold Contributor VII Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 1,953
Registered: ‎05-27-2010
Message 24 of 33
(24,618 Views)

Pretty certain it's not the router (and definitely not the firewall on the router).  The firewall on the router is outward facing keeping traffic from getting into your network and possibly out of our network (but that would take you don't some specific configuration on the firewall to block it).   At a minimum, any device physically plugged into the router will be able to see other local devices and most certaining the router itself.  So, that's why we've given up looking at the router.

 

The symptoms you're describing are indicative of a firewall on the PC blocking traffic ... essentially when you plug the PC into the wire, it sends out a broadcast packet requesting a DHCP address and the DHCP server on the router returns a packet telling your PC which address to use (and other type of directed broadcast).  If either of these packets get blocked -- usually because the firewall software on the PC is filter anything which doesn't appear to be destined for it (which since these are broadcasts sometimes a misconfigured firewall drops mistakenly) -- then the PC doesn't get an address and you see that "limited connectivity" warning.

 

So, I had you try the static IP address configuration on the PC -- which eliminates the DHCP process -- and gives your PC a specific address which should be on the network being listened to by your router.   As this sounds like it didn't work, the speculation is that the PC has a firewall still configured on it and has been told that it's "trusted" network is something other than 192.168.1.x (and worse, possibly to not trust 192.168.1.x).   Windows Firewall, ZoneAlarm, McAfee ... they all can act this way but each has a different way of telling it to not enforce this which is why we've been say to make sure you disable any firewalls on the PC (I wouldn't think you'd want to leave it this way, but it gets it out of the picture while we figure out why it can't talk to the network).

 

So ... let's start over ... pick 1 PC and let's stick with that since I keep hearing about a desktop and laptop (the desktop, no wireless card --- just the network connection) and plug it into the router.  Tell us exactly which operating system you're using on the desktop -- and maybe someone can help walk you thru the configuration screens they would check (or even walk thru their machine with the same OS version and tell you what each screen should say).  Without being able to see it, I think we're all stabbing in the dark.

Copper Contributor ShankedS
Copper Contributor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
Message 25 of 33
(24,583 Views)

Alright, we'll look at the Desktop. It's odd that three computers (at least) can't connect and yet the router has nothing to do with it, but, I know from experience working at my college's tech services that odd, freaky things can happen.

 

The Desktop is custom built with an AMD processor and motherboard which uses the Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller for it's network card and drivers. It's now upgraded to Windows 7 64-bit Home Premium. Windows Firewall is turned off (it has a little notice in the tray saying it's turned off and really wants to turn it on). I had turned it off AND uninstalled Symantec Endpoint from my computer before these last couple posts but nothing changed.

 

I can deal with software problems quite well, but this is delving into an area where my knowledge is quite limited. The computer had previously been configured to work on my school's network, which meant it needed Symantec Endpoint, a specific Certificate, and certain settings in the Authentication tab. When these problems happened when I got home, I uninstalled Endpoint, deleted the certificate and have tried connecting both with Authentication enabled and disabled but none of it has worked.

 

It would make perfect sense, due to the symptoms, to believe that my computer is, for some reason, trying to get an IP address, seeing the IP as odd, and rejecting it. Though that doesn't explain why it won't work with a static IP either. I do hope someone might know something about Windows 7 that will let me look at settings that might be doing this. As I said, the built-in firewall is off.

Copper Contributor ShankedS
Copper Contributor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
Message 26 of 33
(24,522 Views)

Going to try a fresh install of Windows 7 on the Desktop machine next, which means I'll be having it delete everything. Need a newer, better external HDD before I can though so ordering that, when it comes, I'll try and we'll see what happens. Thanks for the help so far.

Copper Contributor ShankedS
Copper Contributor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
Message 27 of 33
(24,307 Views)

I went to go reinstalled Windows 7. Performed an exhaustive backup in preparation. And then, just as I was going to shut it down, I noticed that it wanted to update. Since Windows 7 hadn't been online since I'd installed it, the Windows Updates could only mean that it had somehow gained internet access. I checked, and sure enough it did and has for almost a week now.

 

I don't know why it didn't work, and why it suddenly has worked but it does.

 

I want to thank Lasagna for all of the time and commitment he made to help me with this issue. And for anyone else that contributed something, all of it helped me as I was dealing with this very frustrating moment. Thank you.

Contributor Borgy07836
Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎07-05-2011
Message 28 of 33
(20,920 Views)

I have a similar issue where wireless works fine, however ethernet does connection is not recognized on all computers. Cords and router have been tested. The Dell computer worked using comcast modem without any adjustments to any settings (plug and play) however the computer's ethernet light does not light up when hooked up to the fios modem. I retested at other location using Comcast and ethernet connection is recognized. I am confused why the ethernet connection is not recognized connected to Fios modem knowing the hardware is fine. Settings look fine as far as obtain ip auto, tc ip box checked. I was referred to Dell who could not assist due to warrant expired. I'm hoping there is a simple fix, or I either need to buy a wireless card or switch to Comcast.

Platinum Contributor III Platinum Contributor III
Platinum Contributor III
Posts: 7,367
Registered: ‎12-15-2010
Message 29 of 33
(20,916 Views)

@Borgy07836 wrote:

I have a similar issue where wireless works fine, however ethernet does connection is not recognized on all computers. Cords and router have been tested. The Dell computer worked using comcast modem without any adjustments to any settings (plug and play) however the computer's ethernet light does not light up when hooked up to the fios modem. I retested at other location using Comcast and ethernet connection is recognized. I am confused why the ethernet connection is not recognized connected to Fios modem knowing the hardware is fine. Settings look fine as far as obtain ip auto, tc ip box checked. I was referred to Dell who could not assist due to warrant expired. I'm hoping there is a simple fix, or I either need to buy a wireless card or switch to Comcast.


Could you tell us what NIC the Dell Computer has installed in it? You can find this information out by visiting the Device Manager. This is done either by clicking on the Start Menu and searching for "Device Manager" in the Start Menu search bar, OR by right clicking My Computer, choosing Properties, clicking the Hardware Tab and selecting the Device Manager. Inside of the Device Manager under the Network Adapters category, you will see the name of all installed Network Adapters. 1394 adapters are Firewire adapters, so it'll show up as something else (such as a Realtek or Intel device).

 

Additionally, have you ruled out particualar Ethernet ports on your FiOS router as being faulty, or is it only occurring with certain computers regardless of what port you try on the router? If other computers are working fine, are they connected to the router at 100Mbps or are they at a lower speed, such as 10Mbps? Has Verizon by any chance given you a replacement router?

Copper Contributor ArCan
Copper Contributor
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎07-04-2011
Message 30 of 33
(20,911 Views)

If I right remember

when I asked the installer could I have both 

coax and Ethernet

he told NO.

 

I really don't need TV via FIOS

and my choice was Ethernet.

 

And now I think the situation when

COAX available

Ethernet disabled

is normal.

 

Repeat --- I'm not sure

and it's only for formation and check...

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