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Feature request: add SRV-records capability to FiOS-provided routers

Feature request: add SRV-records capability to FiOS-provided routers

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Copper Contributor corbulon
Copper Contributor
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎03-12-2012
Message 1 of 9
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Like many, I'd like my home printer to be automatically accessible by the various iDevices in the household. The easiest way to do that -- requiring no changes to the devices themselves -- would be by adding a special SRV-record to the home's DNS-server.

Unfortunately, in homes, where the DNS is provided by the FiOS-supplied router, that's not currently possible. The DNS-server built into the routers allows to create only PTR- and A-records, not SRV. Can this be rectified, please?

8 REPLIES 8
Gold Contributor VII Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 5,722
Registered: ‎09-24-2008
Message 2 of 9
(1,981 Views)

The problem with doing that is that according to the ToS only business accounts are allowed to have servers that can reached from the outside.

 

If you really wanted that feature, since Verizon will most not add that, is to use your NAT router.

 

I point to https://www.dslreports.com/faq/16077 and to https://www.dslreports.com/faq/14077

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Copper Contributor corbulon
Copper Contributor
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎03-12-2012
Message 3 of 9
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@dslr595148 wrote:

The problem with doing that is that according to the ToS only business accounts are allowed to have servers that can reached from the outside.


Who said anything about outside access? Should not a "gold contributor" know, what SRV-record is, in DNS parlance?

No, I most certainly do not want my printer to be reachable from the outside -- just in case you are still wondering...

Platinum Contributor II Platinum Contributor II
Platinum Contributor II
Posts: 7,517
Registered: ‎11-04-2008
Message 4 of 9
(1,947 Views)

Couple of comments:

Level of contributor ( is copper,  bronze, gold, etc) is based on number of posts.

All of us are users and may not have the advanced knowledge on all subjects.

As for srv records, Im not sure how many isps offer those records to begin with.

Do you know of any routers that a normal home user would us that supports them?


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Gold Contributor II Gold Contributor II
Gold Contributor II
Posts: 1,948
Registered: ‎05-27-2010
Message 5 of 9
(1,935 Views)

Your approach is wrong.   There isn't a "DNS server" as you say inside th router (or any NAT router for that matter).  Instead, it's just a subset of the DNS server functionality providing DNS recursive query support and cahing.   The behavior you're citing which allows you to define names which will resolve inside your router provides really on a basic name resolution capability as you've observed.  The router is not "authorititative" for any domain in terms of DNS resolution.

 

If you want a more robust approach, you should either run your own internal DNS server and local domain (a small linux server or even a raspberry pi would do the trick) -or- purchase your own domain name.  Most of the major name resellers such as Namecheap, eNom, etc. will allow you to define SRV records as well as any of the miriad of other DNS record types.

 

The article you reference is for a multi-network setup -- and you'll not the examples are specifically showing adding the records to DNS server instance on an AD controller -- i.e. a full DNS server.  If you're in a typical residential environment with a single internal subnet, printer location services which rely on Bonjour or similar methods which are broadcast traffic based work without the need for any SRV definition.  In other words, a printer on the same subnet as your iDevices will automatically be found if the printer supports Airprint and it's enabled.

Copper Contributor corbulon
Copper Contributor
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎03-12-2012
Message 6 of 9
(1,918 Views)
There isn't a "DNS server" as you say inside th router

Huh? Of course, there is! Here:

% nslookup aldan
Server: 192.168.1.1
Address: 192.168.1.1#53 Name: aldan.narawntapu Address: 192.168.1.151

What replied to the query, if it was not the DNS-server inside the router?

 

Instead, it's just a subset of the DNS server functionality providing DNS recursive query support and cahing

Which is exactly, what a DNS-server is. An incomplete one, perhaps, but a DNS-server nonetheless.

 

The router is not "authorititative" for any domain in terms of DNS resolution.

It certainly is authoritative for my local domain (.narawntapu), which is all I care for in this thread. I want the iDevices, which connect to the home WiFi to be able to query the SRV-record of _ipp._tcp.narawntapu.

 

you should either run your own internal DNS server and local domain

Thanks, but I already have a local domain (.narawntapu) and an internal DNS-server -- inside the router. I know, I could stand up a separate daemon -- either on a dedicated box or on one of my existing computers, but I'd rather not duplicate the already existing functionality.

 

My question here was -- and remains -- as to whether that DNS-server inside the router, however incomplete, is capable of serving SRV-records. The hardware is certainly capable, is the software?

 

You insist, that it is not a "full" DNS-server -- maybe. But is it full enough for anything other than PTR- and A-records? It would appear, that the DNS-server inside the Busybox firmware used by these routers is, in fact, perfectly capable. There is just no GUI to add any other record-types... I wonder, if this can be overcome somehow -- and, if it can not be overcome today, I'd like Verizon to add the missing feature. The use-case I describe is perfectly legitimate.

Gold Contributor II Gold Contributor II
Gold Contributor II
Posts: 1,948
Registered: ‎05-27-2010
Message 7 of 9
(1,910 Views)

It is not a server ... it's a caching forwarder/resolver.    Your "internal" domain is not defined either despite your opinion to the contrary as you don't have any SOA records or NS record delegations (even a split DNS scenario using a private internal domain space must define the authoritative records in order to be a properly defined zone).

 

I know of no commercial NAT router which implements anything other than a caching forwarder.   If you want to setup a private domain space, you'll need either create one on a windows server box or load BIND on a unix/linux implementation (either as separate device or gateway).    

Copper Contributor corbulon
Copper Contributor
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎03-12-2012
Message 8 of 9
(1,908 Views)
It is not a server ... it's a caching forwarder/resolver.

Quit arguing semantics, please. Whatever you name it, it can -- and does -- reply to PTR- and A-record quieries regarding my local domain without any forwarding (indeed, where would it forward to?). It is not merely caching some other server's responses in the case of local domain either -- there is simply no other server in the world, that is aware of .narawnapu.

 

Apparently, it can even do AAAA-records.

 

I want it to produce meaningful replies to SRV-type queries as well. Both the hardware and the software (it has Busybox Linux inside) components of the router are perfectly capable of it. The web-GUI is not. Seems like a simple feature to add.

Platinum Contributor II Platinum Contributor II
Platinum Contributor II
Posts: 7,517
Registered: ‎11-04-2008
Message 9 of 9
(1,896 Views)

Might be simple. But there is a cost for every feature.

Development and test aren't free.

And for something that sounds as though it has a very low request rate IMHO


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