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Moving Router from One Port to Another

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Registered: ‎08-31-2020

Moving Router from One Port to Another

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When I moved into my apartment, the tech asked which ethernet site I would like my router. Since I only have FiOS internet (no cable), he was able to just plug a yellow ethernet cord between the WAN port on the router and the CAT5E port in the wall.

 

I asked him if I'd be able to move it to the other side of the room where there was a similar wall port, but he said that based on the main hardware box in the garage (where the Verizon wired hardware lies), the internet was only going to connect from that port unless he made a change downstairs.

 

I unplugged the router and tried it in the new port, and sure enough I could pick it up from my computer, but didn't get internet. Is there a how-to with regards to changing which outlet the internet feeds in my apartment? I have about 6 different sites on 3 floors where it could go. Right now - it is obviously locked into the one that works, but wanted to test other spots out without needing Verizon to come out to my place.

 

Thanks!

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MVP MVP
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Registered: ‎12-02-2012

Re: Moving Router from One Port to Another

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The green cord is not a splitter.  It is a hack device Verizon technicians use instead of installing a proper Ethernet cable termination.  It's fast and easy for the tech.  It works, but it's ugly and takes up too much space.

 

If you're handy, this is an easy job.  You can find inexpensive tools and parts at local home center stores or your favorite online store.

 

Gigabit Ethernet uses all four pairs inside the cable.  Each pair is twisted (thus the name - twisted pair).  The twists are important to reduce interference.  When working with Ethernet cable, never untwist more than is needed.  Use proper tools to strip the outer jacket (the yellow part), otherwise you risk damaging the wires.

 

First, start by opening the desired wall jack and make sure it has a yellow cable in it.  I see some blue cables in your picture; if you see blue when you open it up, you'll want to work with them.

 

Get some Ethernet jacks or a patch panel from your favorite home supply or online store.  Install the jacks or patch panel on all the yellow (or blue) cables.  Then use a cable tester to trace the signal from the desired jack to the newly installed termination.  Once you figure out which cable is the one you want, label it!  Finally, install a short Ethernet patch cable between the ONT and the desired jack.

 

One other note, jacks can be wired according to two standards, TIA568A and TIA568B.  This is simply which color wire goes to which pin on the jack.  You can use either standard, but both ends of the cable must use the same.  When you open the desired wall jack, look closely.  It should be marked to indicate if it's TIA568A or TIA568B.  Then, make sure the jacks or patch panel you install in the garage use the same standard.  If you get it wrong, the lights on the cable tester will light in a funny order.

 

There are plenty of tutorials online about Ethernet cabling.  Poke around and you can find some good advice.

 

Here are some examples of tools and jacks:

If all this is a bit overwhelming, hire someone to do the work for you.  Try a home theater installer or handyman.  An electrician can do this, too, but find one who specializes in low voltage networking - it's quite different than mains power.

 

 

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Re: Moving Router from One Port to Another

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Welcome to the forums!  You're talking with other users here.

The answer is specific to your installation.  The FiOS ONT's Ethernet port is connected to the other end of the wall jack that your router's WAN is plugged into.  You need to find the other end of the wall jack you'd like to use then figure out how to swap it with the current ONT Ethernet connection.

 

Depending on how the Ethernet cables in your home are terminated, this could be as easy as swapping a patch cable or as complex as terminating the existing cable.  If you're handy and get a $15 network cable tracer, you can likely do this yourself.

 

A Verizon tech *might* do this work, but it will cost you.  You could also hire your own contractor to do this; look for someone with low voltage / networking experience.  It doesn't have to be an electrician.

You could also post pictures here of the network gear in the garage and we might be able to figure out what you need to do.

 

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Re: Moving Router from One Port to Another

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Sure good idea. So here's how I think it might be (and correct me along the way!).

 

1.) The Green ethernet cord into the ONT s/plits out and is 'picked up' by a yellow line which routes through the box presumably into the house and the port where internet is active.

 

2.) There are 5 additional, uncut yellow cords that have the other lines 'in them' - they're just not hooked up.

 

Since there's no marking on any, presumably I'd have to cut and test each one out for each ethernet jack to see which worked? Is this a basic/intermediate task?

IMG_0070.jpgIMG_0069.jpg

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MVP MVP
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Posts: 1,680
Registered: ‎12-02-2012

Re: Moving Router from One Port to Another

Message 4 of 6
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The green cord is not a splitter.  It is a hack device Verizon technicians use instead of installing a proper Ethernet cable termination.  It's fast and easy for the tech.  It works, but it's ugly and takes up too much space.

 

If you're handy, this is an easy job.  You can find inexpensive tools and parts at local home center stores or your favorite online store.

 

Gigabit Ethernet uses all four pairs inside the cable.  Each pair is twisted (thus the name - twisted pair).  The twists are important to reduce interference.  When working with Ethernet cable, never untwist more than is needed.  Use proper tools to strip the outer jacket (the yellow part), otherwise you risk damaging the wires.

 

First, start by opening the desired wall jack and make sure it has a yellow cable in it.  I see some blue cables in your picture; if you see blue when you open it up, you'll want to work with them.

 

Get some Ethernet jacks or a patch panel from your favorite home supply or online store.  Install the jacks or patch panel on all the yellow (or blue) cables.  Then use a cable tester to trace the signal from the desired jack to the newly installed termination.  Once you figure out which cable is the one you want, label it!  Finally, install a short Ethernet patch cable between the ONT and the desired jack.

 

One other note, jacks can be wired according to two standards, TIA568A and TIA568B.  This is simply which color wire goes to which pin on the jack.  You can use either standard, but both ends of the cable must use the same.  When you open the desired wall jack, look closely.  It should be marked to indicate if it's TIA568A or TIA568B.  Then, make sure the jacks or patch panel you install in the garage use the same standard.  If you get it wrong, the lights on the cable tester will light in a funny order.

 

There are plenty of tutorials online about Ethernet cabling.  Poke around and you can find some good advice.

 

Here are some examples of tools and jacks:

If all this is a bit overwhelming, hire someone to do the work for you.  Try a home theater installer or handyman.  An electrician can do this, too, but find one who specializes in low voltage networking - it's quite different than mains power.

 

 

View solution in original post

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Contributor
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Registered: ‎08-31-2020

Re: Moving Router from One Port to Another

Message 5 of 6
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Insanely detailed and helpful. Thank you!!

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Posts: 1,680
Registered: ‎12-02-2012

Re: Moving Router from One Port to Another

Message 6 of 6
(266 Views)

Let us know how it works out!

 

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