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Verizon Gateway router often has unfamiliar mysterious devices on My Network list

Verizon Gateway router often has unfamiliar mysterious devices on My Network list

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Contributor Mr-Big-D
Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-19-2015
Message 1 of 10
(20,422 Views)

2015-DEC: There are several things that are questionable and of concern, with this new hardware appliance.

 

(1) My Verizon Gateway router often has unfamiliar mysterious devices listed on the "My Network" page.

I've read other community feedback that suggested the unknown devices are "merely other wireless devices surveying my SSID .. but not making an authenticated aconnection." I respectfully and competely disagree with this, however.

 

One example from MY NETWORK list:
new-host-1
Connection: Wiresless 2.4G
IP Address: 192.168.1.158
Status: Inactive

 

MACs discovered:
• 78:e8:b6:43:ff:ee    --  ZTE Corp -- http://aruljohn.com/mac/78E8B6
• 38:bf:33:83:11:22  --  NEC CASIO Mobile Communications -- http://aruljohn.com/mac/38BF33
• b8:ca:3a:81:72:38  --  DELL -- http://aruljohn.com/mac/B8CA3A
• 90:b6:86:4f:e0:22  --  Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd -- http://aruljohn.com/mac/90B686

 

 

To block these unknown devices, I take the following action:
1. Log into the router
2. Click MY NETWORK and make note of mystery devices (MAC, IP)
3. Click ADVANCED, on top menu
4. Click NETWORK OBJECTS, under Network Settings heading
5. Add an entry for the mysterious device as "Unknown Device ###" with its MAC address
6. Click FIRWALL, on top menu
7. Click ACCESS CONTROL, on left menu
8. Add an entry for the mysterious device, with PROTOCOL: ANY, RULE OCCURS: ALWAYS.


Is anyone else having this experience?


(2) Upon first connecting the new router to coax, and despite having NO hard-wired connections into the router, I now have TWO Ethernet hosts with Static IPs who also have Port Forwarding engaged as "TR69_0" and "TR69_1". I have 3 STBs on Coax, and all other devices are wireless. There are NO Ethernet cables whatsoever in the router .. so why the Ethernet activity? Regarding the TFTP Port Triggering, I believe this is leveraged by Verizon, to push Router and STB firmware changes, etc. Yet, this still does not explain the Ethernet connections. I understand that the STB connect over coax. This is referred to as MoCA; an ethernet protocol developed by Multimedia over Coax Alliance.

 

Some research revealed that TR-069 is Verizon's management system. When one calls their Tech Support to diagnose one's router, VZ is able to see the router via TR69 protocol. Sadly, not everyone at Verizon Tech Support understands or is aware of this fact.

 

More about TR69: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TR-069

 

I also contacted the router's manufacturer, GreenWave, to ask this question www.greenwavesystems.com and, after they escalated to a senior engineer, confessed that they were aware of this "anomaly" but could not offer a repair date.

 

9 REPLIES 9
Nickel Contributor
Nickel Contributor
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎08-17-2015

 

Yes, it happened to  me so I make it a periodic practice of checking to see what's attached to my router, and at times I found some anomalies, devices which I did not recognize.

 

They turn out to be neighbors who hacked my router and using it for their own purposes. At one time, I found 2 or 3 of them connected simultaneously. Like you, I locked them out using their MAC addresses thru the router, utilizing the method you outlined.

 

How did I know this? I use a cheap Tracfone. Someone named Joe had his iphone connected to my router, and I had a device connected to my router called Joes-iphone.  Stupid name to use if you ask me. Got his device's MAC address, locked him out, and when he tried again under another device name, it failed.

 

I did a little research on the issue, and found that it was relatively easy to hack, using hacking software, and a matter of a few minutes. Fortunately, it never happened to me again. I made sure I know the MAC addresses, and device names of devices used in my house, so when interlopers get it, I spot it right away.

Gold Contributor VII Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 2,153
Registered: ‎11-10-2009

@schinfchin wrote:

 

Yes, it happened to  me so I make it a periodic practice of checking to see what's attached to my router, and at times I found some anomalies, devices which I did not recognize.

 

They turn out to be neighbors who hacked my router and using it for their own purposes. At one time, I found 2 or 3 of them connected simultaneously. Like you, I locked them out using their MAC addresses thru the router, utilizing the method you outlined.

 

How did I know this? I use a cheap Tracfone. Someone named Joe had his iphone connected to my router, and I had a device connected to my router called Joes-iphone.  Stupid name to use if you ask me. Got his device's MAC address, locked him out, and when he tried again under another device name, it failed.

 

I did a little research on the issue, and found that it was relatively easy to hack, using hacking software, and a matter of a few minutes. Fortunately, it never happened to me again. I made sure I know the MAC addresses, and device names of devices used in my house, so when interlopers get it, I spot it right away.


try changing the router to wpa2 security and create a complex password

 

Nickel Contributor
Nickel Contributor
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎08-17-2015
Message 4 of 10
(20,296 Views)

 

viafax:

 

Already done that, and I since upgraded to Quantum as well, which came with the stronger password. I go into the router several times a week to shut off my daughter's laptop and tablet, and look to see what's connected while I'm at it. I do that when she refuses to do homework.

Contributor MrBigOne
Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎12-27-2015
Message 5 of 10
(19,910 Views)

viafax999 wrote:

"try changing the router to wpa2 security and create a complex password"

 

 

Thanks but this is already the case.  It's of significant concern that these UNIDENTIFIED, unknown, rogue devices are obtaining an IP address on our private network.

 

Calling Verizon support is a waste of time, as the typical rep hasn't a clue about anything outside of the "standard" troubleshooting / how-to questions.

 

#NOThappyWithVerizon

MVP CRobGauth MVP
MVP
Posts: 7,713
Registered: ‎11-04-2008

Would be hard for an ISP to help you track down people accessing your network.

Do you see the MAC address of these unkown devices?

If so, you can try googling them to at least see what type of device it could be (not 100% but might help).

I assume they are coming in via wifi.

It is not hard to crack passwords if you can get enough data.

So if you have a close nieghbor, they could be doing it.

About the only way to stop it is to allow access by mac address only.


If a forum member gives an answer you like, give them the Kudos they deserve. If a member gives you the answer to your question, mark the answer as Accepted Solution so others can see the solution to the problem.
Contributor MrBigOne
Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎12-27-2015
Message 7 of 10
(19,802 Views)

@CRobGauth - thanks for the reply .. but you apparently did not read fully the original post, as MAC information was collected and disclosed herein.

 

Regarding your suggestion to employ MAC Filtering, that approach is archaic and quite easily hacked.

 

And, last but not least, I would think that the ISP *is* fully responsible for defective hardware which they provide their customers, when this results in one's private home network being compromised.

Gold Contributor VII Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 2,153
Registered: ‎11-10-2009

I guess you must live in a very built up neighborhood with many wifi clients around you.

Hacking a wpa2 password is not as easy as you seem to assume it is.  Basically the only way to do that is to get the passcode that you created for the connection.  As you created that password and presumably change it regularly and I guess don't hand it out to anybody the somebody would need to be monitoring your network traffic all the time to be able to capture the 4 way handshake when somebody attaches and from that dump out the password.  Frpm your example of Joes-iphone that seems a very unlikely scenario.

How many other wifi connections, other than your own, can you see from your client devices?

 

Contributor MrBigOne
Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎12-27-2015
Message 9 of 10
(19,692 Views)

@viafax999 - It's presumed that your inquiry is directed to user "schinfchin", since their prior post mentioned the iphone of your topic.

 

I agree it's not child's play to hack MAC Filtering .. but it is possible and, hence, should not be anyone's sole line of defense.  Here's just one of many supporting articles:  http://www.howtogeek.com/132348/dont-have-a-false-sense-of-security-5-insecure-ways-to-secure-your-w...

 

 

Contributor BriceNYC
Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎06-04-2017

Yes Ive been having the same problem with unknown IP set boxes and devices on my network and what appears to be hacked local host addresses. Im shocked and have filed complaints with Verizon and cursory complaint with the Internet Crime report.  I hope Verizon takes this seriously!!

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