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Verizon's OnDemand movie policy

Verizon's OnDemand movie policy

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Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 2,325
Registered: ‎08-05-2008
Message 11 of 16
(1,175 Views)

@film11 wrote:

Well, despite having started this thread, Verizon fooled me again.  The have a 9-minute preview of some available movies. I looked at the one for IDENTITY THEFT and it showed the movie being presented properly, at least in SD.  So we ordered it (in HD).  Low and behold, the movie was presented cropped with picture information missing. A REAL scam!

 

To illustrate just how movies are being presented when you pay $6 or $8 or more for a FIOS OnDemand movie, below is an image from TOMBSTONE.  This was shown not by FIOS but from a recent Cinemax presentation (MAX and HBO always eliminate picture from movies they show), but FIOS is doing the exact same thing, Now imagine how this affects action or visual effects movies. And why it is such a despicable practice. (Especially in light of 9-minute previews falsely indicating a movie is presented unaltered.)

 

 

tomb.jpg


One of the reasons I have never payed for an ON DEMAND movie from Verizon and won't in the future.  Some time ago I put a suggestion on the (nearly worthless) Share Your Ideas page to indicate OAR (original aspect ratio) when applicable, but just got the "acknowledged" and nothing since (maybe because none of their movies are OAR?).  Will continue to use Redbox retail for my rentals (cheaper and as the director intended).

If a forum member gives an answer you like, give them the Kudos they deserve. If a member gives you the answer to your question, mark the answer as Accepted Solution so others can see the solution to the problem.
Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 503
Registered: ‎08-06-2009
Message 12 of 16
(1,112 Views)

An interesting article regarding cropping by Netflix.  But, unlike Verizon, at least Netflix is aware of the issue and looks to resolve it.  I've also added another example of what gets lost when Verizon presents altered movies. (From "Man in the Moon")

 

 

A Tunbkr blog "What Netflix Does" claims to aggregate instances of Netflix cropping films offered through its streaming service. It posts pictures comparing a film's original aspect ratio to its aspect ratio on Netfix, finding that many films have in fact been changed from how they were shown initially in theaters. Started four months ago, "What Netflix Does" caught the attention of Gizmodo and other news sites on Wednesday.

In a statement to The Huffington Post, Netflix categorically denied that it intentionally cuts off portions of the picture for movies it streams, claiming that any altered aspect ratio is a mistake.

"We want to offer the best picture and provide the original aspect ratio of any title on Netflix," Netflix spokesman Joris Evers said in an email. "However, unfortunately our quality controls sometimes fail and we end up offering the wrong version of a title. When we discover this error, we replace that title as soon as possible."

The visual differences recall the days of the dreaded "pan and scan," a method of formatting films for television broadcasts that alters the HD widescreen aspect ratio that the majority of films are shot in to the 4:3 ratio of older TVs. This results in the loss of 50 to 60 percent of picture and artificial camera movements that filmmakers never intended.

 

How a film is meant to be seen:

 

 

How it would appear if presented by FIOS (at your cost of $5.99 and up)

 

Copper Contributor MS13
Copper Contributor
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎12-06-2010
Message 13 of 16
(1,073 Views)

It stinks that FIOS falsely give the impression that the movies aren't messed with.  {please keep it relevant}

Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 503
Registered: ‎08-06-2009
Message 14 of 16
(1,045 Views)

@Keyboards wrote:
Will continue to use Redbox retail for my rentals (cheaper and as the director intended).


Just don't use Verizon's REDBOX INSTANT.  Those movies are cropped also!

Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 503
Registered: ‎08-06-2009
Message 15 of 16
(1,041 Views)

Part of the issue is that Verizon offers 9-minute previews on some films where it appears the movie is shown correctly.  But then, when a customer orders the movie, it is a cropped version.  Personally, I do find that deceitful...as much as FIOS giving no indication that the movies have been altered. 

Contributor JS3313
Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎06-25-2013
Message 16 of 16
(915 Views)
Well, at least Netflix listens.  Guess those blogs worked!  They have replaced a number of cropped movies and now show the correct versions!
A few I know of...CAPT AMERICA, THE CORE, THOR. MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 3...all now available to be streamed via Netflix as they were intended!  Have to give NF credit...at least they listen to their subscribers.  If there's a movie that you like but it's cropped via NF, just let them know.  I bet they'll fix it.  A shame VZ won't do the same or at least address the isue.

@film11 wrote:

 

A Tunbkr blog "What Netflix Does" claims to aggregate instances of Netflix cropping films offered through its streaming service. It posts pictures comparing a film's original aspect ratio to its aspect ratio on Netfix, finding that many films have in fact been changed from how they were shown initially in theaters. Started four months ago, "What Netflix Does" caught the attention of Gizmodo and other news sites on Wednesday.

In a statement to The Huffington Post, Netflix categorically denied that it intentionally cuts off portions of the picture for movies it streams, claiming that any altered aspect ratio is a mistake.

"We want to offer the best picture and provide the original aspect ratio of any title on Netflix," Netflix spokesman Joris Evers said in an email. "However, unfortunately our quality controls sometimes fail and we end up offering the wrong version of a title. When we discover this error, we replace that title as soon as possible."

The visual differences recall the days of the dreaded "pan and scan," a method of formatting films for television broadcasts that alters the HD widescreen aspect ratio that the majority of films are shot in to the 4:3 ratio of older TVs. This results in the loss of 50 to 60 percent of picture and artificial camera movements that filmmakers never intended.

 


 

 


 

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