Accessibility Resource Center Skip to main content
Get it fast with In-Store & Curbside Pickup or same day delivery.

1080p capable set top boxes?

Reply
SantaOG160
Copper Contributor
Copper Contributor
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎12-20-2009

1080p capable set top boxes?

Message 1 of 6
(8,763 Views)

Hi,

 

I notice that the Verizon STB's are incapable of outputting  1080p. After looking at DVD's and Blu-Ray content that gets output and rendered crisply on my HDTV, I really wonder why Verizon made this move in hardware.

 

Only one broadcast channel that I know of broadcasts in 1080p (Fox, I believe). But if Channel Service providers such as Verizon do not provide the hardware to transmit a 1080p signal, how do you expect more channels to make the move to 1080p.

 

It seems like a chicken vs. egg situation. Are there any plans by Verizon to offer an upgraded STB in the future?

 

Thanks for your time.

5 REPLIES 5
JustLou
Copper Contributor
Copper Contributor
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎12-13-2009

Re: 1080p capable set top boxes?

Message 2 of 6
(8,747 Views)

AFAIK, Fox broadacsts in 720p, and nobody broadcasts in 1080p.

ekem015
Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎12-15-2009

Re: 1080p capable set top boxes?

Message 3 of 6
(8,733 Views)

I think anyone broadcasts in 1080p. Fox broadcasts in 720p.

Hubrisnxs
Platinum Contributor III
Platinum Contributor III
Posts: 5,881
Registered: ‎07-22-2009

Re: 1080p capable set top boxes?

Message 4 of 6
(8,690 Views)

I am pretty sure that noone broadcasts in 1080p yet. 

 

the closest thing you will see is a single 1080p VOD which is not broadcast but it's a video on demand library title which is normally an internet download vs being broadcast over coax or over fiber.  so it's being delivered via IP. 

 

 

spacedebris
Gold Contributor V
Gold Contributor V
Posts: 1,692
Registered: ‎05-17-2009

Re: 1080p capable set top boxes?

Message 5 of 6
(8,682 Views)

No channels broadcast in 1080p.  1080i is the highest resolution currently used by broadcasters.

 

Both Dish Network and Direct TV are advertising that they are broadcasting in 1080p but what they are doing is "upconverting". It while it technically gives you the 1080p, it does not actually improve the picture at all Just copies some lines and adds more in.

 

Since there is no boadcasters that actually broadcast in 1080p, neither does Verizon. 1080i is all that Verizon will send out. Therefore no need in having a box to put out a signal that is not being sent to it.

 

remember, Very few programs are even FILMED in 1080p. Almost all series programs are only filmed in 720 and few movies are even filmed in 1080i. Only the biggest blockbusters are filmed in 1080p. The equipment to film in 1080p is too expensive for most at this point. It will be a few more years before it becomes mainstream.




====================================================================================

Error exists between keyboard and chair.
KenAF
Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 585
Registered: ‎10-22-2008

Re: 1080p capable set top boxes?

Message 6 of 6
(8,650 Views)

 


@spacedebris wrote:

 

No channels broadcast in 1080p.  1080i is the highest resolution currently used by broadcasters.


Correct.  There are no existing (or announced) local or cable channels available in 1080p.

@spacedebris wrote:

 

Both Dish Network and Direct TV are advertising that they are broadcasting in 1080p but what they are doing is "upconverting". It while it technically gives you the 1080p, it does not actually improve the picture at all Just copies some lines and adds more in.


DirecTV and Dish Network do offer 1080p24 content, but only for PPV and Internet-downloaded VOD.    On DirecTV and Dish Network boxes, all local and cable channels are output at a maximum of 1080i.

 

The boxes from Dish Network and DirecTV are not able to upconvert any content to 1080p.  Those boxes are based on the same Broadcom CPU found in the QIP7216; they do not have 1080p60 upconversion capability.

 


@spacedebris wrote:

 

remember, Very few programs are even FILMED in 1080p. Almost all series programs are only filmed in 720 and few movies are even filmed in 1080i. Only the biggest blockbusters are filmed in 1080p. The equipment to film in 1080p is too expensive for most at this point. It will be a few more years before it becomes mainstream.


Actually, that is not the case. 


The expensive equipment to which you refer is for 1080p60 acquisition.  That's the sort of equipment you would want for sports in 1080p.   But it is not what is needed for the typical Hollywood movie or episodic TV series, which are acquired at 24 frames per second.  Mainstream cameras have acquired in 1080p24 for years, and many consumer camcorders now acquire in 1080p24 as well.

 

Virtually every series on network television is acquired in 1080p24.  The full information for the 1080p picture can be represented with 1080i.  The process to detect and output a 1080p24 source contained within a 1080i signal is known as inverse telecine, or IVTC.   The better displays on the market do it, although some do it more reliably than others.  On a display that correctly and reliably performs this function, the 1080i output from a Blu-ray player is identical to the 1080p output.  Various reviews and magazines test this capability and refer to it in their reviews as "1080i film resolution."

 

On a display with this capability, you are able to get a true 1080p picture (although highly compressed) with many popular series on CBS and NBC.  Displays without this capability are not able to produce as detailed a picture on the same shows, and they exhibit more blurring during movement and scene transitions.  Excessive blurring during movement and scene transitions can be caused by excessive compression, but it can also be caused by the TV's inability to perform this function.  The dropoff in quality on a TV without inverse telecine (i.e. 1080i film deinterlace) capability will depend in large part on the quality of its 1080i video deinterlace, which is what it would use instead.

 

If you are the original poster (OP) and your issue is solved, please remember to click the "Solution?" button so that others can more easily find it.
How-To Videos
 
The following videos were produced by users like you!
   
Videos are subject to the Verizon Fios Community Terms of Service and User Guidelines and contains content that is not created by Verizon.
Have a spare Fios-G1100?Learn how to bridge it into your network
Get Started


Covid19

Browse Categories
Categories:
Posts

Verizon Troubleshooters
Unable to find your answer here? Try searching Verizon Troubleshooters for more options.