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Anyway to get a 1080p signal from fios?

Anyway to get a 1080p signal from fios?

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Copper Contributor Deluxe
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Registered: ‎05-05-2009
Message 31 of 42
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Ken, thanks again for the response. I don't seem to be experiencing blurriness.

What's the difference between Video and and film de-interlace?

DVD's look great. Hi Def looks great via Verizon. Sports look great.

I just have problems when it's fast action panning on hi def movies or shows. Strobe lights or flashes also seem to pixilate.

I've also noticed this  on my old standard def Tosiba, but it's more subtle becuase it's lower def.

So far everyone says it's the signal and the TV is just very sharp and shows it more than others.

 

I guess my question is how/when do I tell if I'm experienceing the failure of the film-deinterlacing?

 

Thanks again for you help and thanks for the settings. 

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Silver Contributor IV
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Registered: ‎10-22-2008
Message 32 of 42
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@Deluxe wrote:

Ken, thanks again for the response. I don't seem to be experiencing blurriness.

What's the difference between Video and and film de-interlace?



Film deinterlace -- also known as inverse telecine --- is meant for film sourced content. including most episodic series (CSI, Heroes, etc), documentaries, and movies shown on 1080i channels.   Video deinterlace is meant for video sourced content, such as live news and sports, shown on 1080i channels.   Displays like your older Panasonic do not support film deinterlace for HD, so video deinterlace is used for everything.

 

The use of video deinterlace on film results in significant loss of resolution (i.e. softer, less smooth images) during motion; it may also produce interlace artifacts such as jagged edges, horizontal lines, and tearing.  For a more detailed explanation, see my first posts to this thread.

 

The artifacts you see with strobe lights and flashes are compression related, not display related.   You would see them no matter what display you have.

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Copper Contributor Deluxe
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Registered: ‎05-05-2009
Message 33 of 42
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Not sure what tearing is. I don't get horizontal lines  (it's more like a screen door). It's actually much like the strobe light artifacts in that you see break up. It's very fine.

The reviewer from CNet told me to try it on 720p since that doesn't need to de-interlace. He's also saying it's the source, not the TV. Why would they give it such a high rating and recommend it if it's going to pixilate during fast action movies? Why would it be fine during DVD's? Doesn't it still have to de-interlace?

 

Thanks. 

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Silver Contributor IV
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Registered: ‎10-22-2008
Message 34 of 42
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@Deluxe wrote:

Not sure what tearing is. I don't get horizontal lines  (it's more like a screen door). It's actually much like the strobe light artifacts in that you see break up. It's very fine.

 


Much of what you are seeing are compression artifacts.  More movement requires more bandwidth, and if bandwidth is unavailable, compression artifacts are the result.  Verizon passes most channels as is, with exception to most premium movie channels, so this compression is applied by the local affiliate and/or content provider.

 


@Deluxe wrote:

 

The reviewer from CNet told me to try it on 720p since that doesn't need to de-interlace. He's also saying it's the source, not the TV. Why would they give it such a high rating and recommend it if it's going to pixilate during fast action movies? Why would it be fine during DVD's? Doesn't it still have to de-interlace?


The reviewer probably meant a 720p channel.  Changing output to 720p does not eliminate the need to deinterlace 1080i channels.  But anything you see on a 720p channel like FOX, ABC, or ESPN is already deinterlaced...so long as you output it as 720p to your TV.

 

Most TVs can correctly deinterlace 480i (SD) film sources; HD deinterlace is far more computationally intensive than SD.

If you are the original poster (OP) and your issue is solved, please remember to click the "Solution?" button so that others can more easily find it.
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Copper Contributor Deluxe
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Registered: ‎05-05-2009
Message 35 of 42
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Ken, thanks again. Sorry to be dense.... Is there a good way to figure out what I'm seeing is compression and what is deinterlacing failure? When I put it on 720 I still saw some artifacts (although not as prominent, I guess because of resolution).

 

You say Verizon doesn't pass on the premium movie channels as is. Do they compress them? That's where I seem to have my problems?

 

Thanks again for your patience,

 

Scott 

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Gold Contributor VII
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Registered: ‎08-05-2008
Message 36 of 42
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@Deluxe wrote:

 

 

... You say Verizon doesn't pass on the premium movie channels as is. Do they compress them? That's where I seem to have my problems?

 

Thanks again for your patience,

 

Scott 


Other than the east coast feeds the video provided from the source (HBO, STARZ, MAX, etc.) is provided to Verizon as MPEG-4.  Since the majority of the Verizon HD boxes / DVRs do not support MPEG-4 (only the newer 7xxx series does) and to my knowledge no cable card TVs support MPEG-4, Verizon has to transcode these (decode and re-encode) as MPEG-2.

Message Edited by Keyboards on 05-08-2009 12:56 PM
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Copper Contributor Deluxe
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Registered: ‎05-05-2009
Message 37 of 42
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Thanks for the reply. I'm not very tech savvy. 

I'm on the east coast. I have a 6 series box.

Does all this essentialy mean they're compressing the signal and that's why I'm getting some artifacts? I don't see the same problem when I play the same movies via DVD.

 

Thanks,

Scott 

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Gold Contributor VII
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Message 38 of 42
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@Deluxe wrote:

Thanks for the reply. I'm not very tech savvy. 

I'm on the east coast. I have a 6 series box.

Does all this essentialy mean they're compressing the signal and that's why I'm getting some artifacts? I don't see the same problem when I play the same movies via DVD.

 

Thanks,

Scott 


In general the answer is no.  All the primary east coast premiums are sent on as delivered by the provider.  The ones delivered in MPEG-4 are decoded and re-encoded as MPEG-2.  It is possible that there is additional compression at this point, but I do not have any definitive information one way or the other.

 

Remember, even what is passed directly is compressed at the source - both MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 are compressed formats.  NO ONE provides an uncompressed signal (the bandwidth required is prohibitive), the only question is how much the source has been squeezed by the original provider to reduce bandwidth and this has nothing to do with Verizon. 

 

Currently Verizon only puts 2 HD channels per QAM while Comcast is adding additional compression to get 3 HD channels per QAM.

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Copper Contributor wessock
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Registered: ‎04-15-2009
Message 39 of 42
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@BigDaddyTees wrote:

A couple of weeks ago, I purchased a 32 Inch Sony Bravia 720p but yet 1080p compatible HDTV. I know my TV is capable of receiving 1080p signals as most HDTV’s are in the modern era. However, Fios via the HD DVR only broadcast up to a 1080I signal. My question is this, is there anyway to get a 1080p signal from Fios or will 1080I have to be settled for? What I mean is under video options on the set top box the options are 480I, 480P, 720P and 1080I there is no 1080P option.


 

Well to start with, which I didn't see anybody address yet, any source above 720p would be pointless on your TV anyway, by your description. 720P is the highest your panel can display. It will only down convert a 1080i/1080p signal to 720p resolution anyway. They word these descriptions in misleading ways on purpose to confuse buyers. But the short answer is, just set your box to 720p because your TV can't actually display anything higher. It might even be a better picture since your TV isn't down converting.

 

For your set it doesn't matter, but while there won't be direct broadcasts in 1080p for a long time, Verizon is close to offering 1080p On Demand content. Do a google search about it. It's already being tested with pricing and everything.

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Copper Contributor Deluxe
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Registered: ‎05-05-2009
Message 40 of 42
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Why would a movie I see on HBO, Starz, etc have the artifacts and the same movie via a DVD player not have it. If it was a problem with the TV it would have a problem either way wouldn't it?

 

Thanks, 

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