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Buying your own Equipment

Buying your own Equipment

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Contributor RobbyTech
Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-11-2009
Message 1 of 9
(10,068 Views)

Has anyone bought their own set top box and had them activated?Did Verizon just do it?Where there fees involved?Any help would be great.

 

8 REPLIES 8
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Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 585
Registered: ‎10-22-2008
Message 2 of 9
(10,062 Views)

The Motorola QIP STBs and DVRs used by Verizon are not available for resale.  The only Motorola boxes you'll find for FiOS are stolen, and Verizon does not activate stolen equipment.

 

If you want your own equipment, your only options are the MoxiHD ($799 w/o fees) and TivoHD ($199 at Sears with fees, $600 w/o fees).  These products require one M-CARD from Verizon ($3.99/mo) to support both built-in tuners; this plugs into the front of the box and authorizes all the channels you pay for.

 

Generally, one does not save money by buying their own equipment.  Verizon FiOS, like most cable companies, does not make money on their equipment.  They subsidize the boxes and make their money on the programming.

 

The primary reasons to buy your own equipment include better DVR functionality, better reliability (thanks to superior guide data), increased storage capacity and storage expansion, and the ability to download recordings to your computer.

Message Edited by KenAF on 03-11-2009 06:12 PM
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Platinum Contributor III
Platinum Contributor III
Posts: 6,819
Registered: ‎08-23-2008
Message 3 of 9
(10,053 Views)
Dito on what KenAF has said. Also if you do use your own equipment you will not be able to get Verizon Video On Demand, Channel Guide, or Widgets. The Cable Card unlocks subscribed channels but does not provide the three items previously mentioned. Some like the Tivo Guide and do not care about the Verizon features mentioned. If you have a DCR Digital Cable Ready HD TV it  can use the Cable Card, but it will not be a DVR and will not have a guide.
Message Edited by prisaz on 03-11-2009 06:01 PM
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Copper Contributor dojo
Copper Contributor
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎03-13-2009
Message 4 of 9
(9,961 Views)

Some TVs generate menus from the TV Guide data.  What is nice about these menus is that you can personalize them - put the channels you actually watch together.  You can even blank out channels you never watch - the infomecial and leased channels for example.  While the service providers would like to control what you see, you can by pass them with a cable card.  Of course you don't get any of thier content like "on demand" services, but when you control things there is no need for a box.  Or at least it is supposed to be that way.  Freedom of choice and environmentally friendly.

 

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Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 159
Registered: ‎03-13-2009
Message 5 of 9
(9,943 Views)

When the "all digital" finally goes through for everyone, they are expecting in future to have more manufacturers of converter boxes to be sold to the general public.  That is why the 7k series contains a small cable card in the back.  I am guessing in the near future you can go out and buy, for example, a Sony converter box.  All that Verizon will have to provide is a cable card to initialize/activate your services for your converter box to work. 

 

More manufacturers = more competition = better prices for all of us.  Smiley Wink

.,.
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Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 2,325
Registered: ‎08-05-2008
Message 6 of 9
(9,900 Views)

@DzWR wrote:

When the "all digital" finally goes through for everyone, they are expecting in future to have more manufacturers of converter boxes to be sold to the general public.  That is why the 7k series contains a small cable card in the back.  I am guessing in the near future you can go out and buy, for example, a Sony converter box.  All that Verizon will have to provide is a cable card to initialize/activate your services for your converter box to work. 

 

More manufacturers = more competition = better prices for all of us.  Smiley Wink


Actually, the 7xxx series has a cable card (not just a slot for one) because the FCC mandated separable security.

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Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 159
Registered: ‎03-13-2009
Message 7 of 9
(9,898 Views)
I know, thats why I said it contains one.  Smiley Wink
.,.
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Contributor cgquadman
Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
Message 8 of 9
(9,364 Views)

Rental on a Home Media DVR box is $19.99 a month or $239.88 a year and the HD DVR costs $15.99 or $191.88 a year. Those are hefty fees and after a couple of years would justify the purchase -- if you could purchase them. Electronic equipment proces are always falling but these rental/lease boxes never do.

 

I can't imagine Verizon -- or any other content provider, doesn't make some money off these fees.

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Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 585
Registered: ‎10-22-2008
Message 9 of 9
(9,286 Views)

@cgquadman wrote:

Rental on a Home Media DVR box is $19.99 a month or $239.88 a year and the HD DVR costs $15.99 or $191.88 a year. Those are hefty fees and after a couple of years would justify the purchase -- if you could purchase them. Electronic equipment proces are always falling but these rental/lease boxes never do.

 

I can't imagine Verizon -- or any other content provider, doesn't make some money off these fees.


Modern cable DVRs cost between $300 and $400, but that does not include the cost of the software.  I think you would be very surprised at the amount of money that is spent on DVR software development.

 

Cable DVRs also tend not to last as long as you might expect.   The average usable lifetime for a deployed cable DVR is less than 30 months. Some DVRs fail because they are mistreated (ex: used in poorly ventilated cabinets), some are mishandled during repeated transport or removal, some have their drives fail prematurely in normal operation, and other boxes are never returned (and never paid for).

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