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No wiring diagram for my model DVR

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Contributor
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Posts: 2
Registered: ‎05-22-2010

No wiring diagram for my model DVR

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My DVR is a Motorola HD DVR QIP 6416-2 

 

The wiring diagram in the QIP6200/QIP64xx User Manual does not match the reality of what's on the back panel of my box.

 

I do not have either item # 2 (RF out), or item #17 (SATA).  Don't care about 17, but the RF out is supposedly what goes to my VCR.

 

I originally had a VCR and DVD/VCR attached between the DVR STB and my TV.  I recently removed the extra VCR, and instead of the wiring getting easier, it seems like it's more difficult.

 

It was originally set to use Component Connectors (R/W/Y) out of the DVR to the TV, and Coax connectors between the VCR, DVD/VCR and TV.  I should have looked more closely at how the VCR & DVD/VCR were connected, but unfortunately didn't when I disconnected the extra VCR.

 

The TV has only 1 set of 3 component connector inputs, and 1 coax input.

 

The DVD/VCR has an ANT in and out, and several different component connector ins/outs.

 

Can someone explain the correct way to attach everything?  I've tried everything I can think of and, while my FIOS DVR plays fine, I can't get the DVD to display.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

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Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎12-15-2009

Re: No wiring diagram for my model DVR

Message 2 of 3
(3,503 Views)

You really don't need the coax connections between the DVR and the DVD/VCR or the DVD/VCR and the TV. They are antiquated in the sense that they only deliver mono audio and were meant more for older TVs that only had a coax input and needed to tune to 3 or 4 to get the VCR input.

 

Instead, I would recommend using Composite (red, white, yellow) connectors between your DVD/VCR and TV. You mistakently referred to the r-w-y cables as component; component cables are actually green-blue-red (video) and red-yellow (audio). They are capable of transmitting HD signals (composite are not), but I would guess from your description that you do not have an HDTV.

 

Now, if I read you correctly, you said that you only have one set of composite (r-w-y) connectors on your TV. Is that really all? Does it only have a coax input and one composite input? If so, then that sounds like a pretty old/basic TV. If you have any other connectors on your TV, please say so, because it changes what I am recommending below.

 

I would recommend that you use coax from the wall to the DVR. Then from there, I would recommend composite from the DVR to the DVD/VCR, then composite again from the DVD/VCR to the TV. Then, you just need to turn your TV to the "input" or "composite" or similar source to get the signal from the DVR. This will mean that you will need to have your DVD player on whenever you want to watch TV, whether you are actually using the DVD player or not. It may also slightly degrade the quality of the picture, because of the analog nature of the DVD/VCR box. You will also need to turn your DVD/VCR to its "input" or similar channel; using its tuner won't work because the DVR is doing the tuning for you. This of course means you will need to have your DVR on and tuned to whatever channel you want to record, and it will also record any menus or info bars that come up. This is unavoidable these days if you want to record directly from live TV to DVD/VHS, because a DVD player can't tune to digital stations, which are all FiOS channels. But if you record first to your DVR, then to your DVD/VHS, you will be fine.

 

[Try this first -->] There is only one other possibility that I can think of, given your situation (A: TV only has coax/1 composite input, and B: DVR does not have a coax output). That is, buy and use component (green, blue, red) cables, plus red-white audio cables (just let the yellow hang loose) from the DVR to the DVD/VCR, assuming it has that input. Then, use your composite cables from the DVR to the TV. That will allow you to watch TV without turning on your DVD/VCR, as long as you have your TV on the "input" or "composite" or similar channel. However, that uses up your one free composite port on your TV, meaning you will need to use coax from your DVD/VCR to your TV (still setting your DVD to its "input" channel) and then tuning to channel 3 or 4 on your TV to pick up the signal from your DVD player. I'm not sure if that will work 100% though.

 

Ideally, you would also like to have some other connection from the DVR to the TV to bypass your DVD/VCR and the problems it may give you when you are just watching TV (not watching a DVD or recording). This is because if you have an HDTV, then you wouldn't be able to watch HD if you were passing through your DVD first. But since it sounds like you don't have an HDTV, I don't think that will be a problem for you.

 

Let me know how this works.

 

In the end, if I am correctly assuming that you do not own an HDTV, I would suggest investing in one. For a small-to-mid size HDTV these days, which is all that is sold, it will probably run you $300-$500. The reason why I suggest this is because your current TV is bottlenecking you in terms of the services you are getting from Verizon. Your DVR does not require any hardware or price changes in order to give you HD; your TV is the only limitation. Likewise, as long as you have the FiOS TV Premier (I think? from a few years ago) package, or any of the currently-available packages (Prime HD, Extreme HD, Ultimate HD), then you get all the HD channels for the SD channels that you get at no additional cost (and like I said, there is no new equipment needed because every Verizon DVR is by default an HD DVR, at no extra cost). So if you are only using a non-HD TV, then you are basically wasting money. That is just the nature of Verizon. If you were on a regular cable system, then they would provide a basic/expanded basic cable package (1-99 usually) in analog for people without HDTV's, and then any digital set-top boxes or HD channels are an add-on from the base price. For Verizon, they have an all-digital, mostly-encypted system that requires set-top boxes on all TVs, HD or not. So if you do not have an HDTV, you are still paying for the access to HD in most cases, which makes it a wise investment to buy an HDTV and get the full benefit.

 

If you do end up going that route, I would suggest composite from the DVR to the DVD/VCR, then composite from the DVD/VCR to the TV. Then I would suggest HDMI from the DVR to the TV. You can call Verizon and ask them for an HDMI cable for free (they ship to your house them with any set-top boxes you order after installation), or if that doesn't work, you can find one for cheap online. This is a cheap solution: https://teleproducts.verizon.com/fios/index.cfm/eh/DisplayDetails

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Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎12-15-2009

Re: No wiring diagram for my model DVR

Message 2 of 3
(3,504 Views)

You really don't need the coax connections between the DVR and the DVD/VCR or the DVD/VCR and the TV. They are antiquated in the sense that they only deliver mono audio and were meant more for older TVs that only had a coax input and needed to tune to 3 or 4 to get the VCR input.

 

Instead, I would recommend using Composite (red, white, yellow) connectors between your DVD/VCR and TV. You mistakently referred to the r-w-y cables as component; component cables are actually green-blue-red (video) and red-yellow (audio). They are capable of transmitting HD signals (composite are not), but I would guess from your description that you do not have an HDTV.

 

Now, if I read you correctly, you said that you only have one set of composite (r-w-y) connectors on your TV. Is that really all? Does it only have a coax input and one composite input? If so, then that sounds like a pretty old/basic TV. If you have any other connectors on your TV, please say so, because it changes what I am recommending below.

 

I would recommend that you use coax from the wall to the DVR. Then from there, I would recommend composite from the DVR to the DVD/VCR, then composite again from the DVD/VCR to the TV. Then, you just need to turn your TV to the "input" or "composite" or similar source to get the signal from the DVR. This will mean that you will need to have your DVD player on whenever you want to watch TV, whether you are actually using the DVD player or not. It may also slightly degrade the quality of the picture, because of the analog nature of the DVD/VCR box. You will also need to turn your DVD/VCR to its "input" or similar channel; using its tuner won't work because the DVR is doing the tuning for you. This of course means you will need to have your DVR on and tuned to whatever channel you want to record, and it will also record any menus or info bars that come up. This is unavoidable these days if you want to record directly from live TV to DVD/VHS, because a DVD player can't tune to digital stations, which are all FiOS channels. But if you record first to your DVR, then to your DVD/VHS, you will be fine.

 

[Try this first -->] There is only one other possibility that I can think of, given your situation (A: TV only has coax/1 composite input, and B: DVR does not have a coax output). That is, buy and use component (green, blue, red) cables, plus red-white audio cables (just let the yellow hang loose) from the DVR to the DVD/VCR, assuming it has that input. Then, use your composite cables from the DVR to the TV. That will allow you to watch TV without turning on your DVD/VCR, as long as you have your TV on the "input" or "composite" or similar channel. However, that uses up your one free composite port on your TV, meaning you will need to use coax from your DVD/VCR to your TV (still setting your DVD to its "input" channel) and then tuning to channel 3 or 4 on your TV to pick up the signal from your DVD player. I'm not sure if that will work 100% though.

 

Ideally, you would also like to have some other connection from the DVR to the TV to bypass your DVD/VCR and the problems it may give you when you are just watching TV (not watching a DVD or recording). This is because if you have an HDTV, then you wouldn't be able to watch HD if you were passing through your DVD first. But since it sounds like you don't have an HDTV, I don't think that will be a problem for you.

 

Let me know how this works.

 

In the end, if I am correctly assuming that you do not own an HDTV, I would suggest investing in one. For a small-to-mid size HDTV these days, which is all that is sold, it will probably run you $300-$500. The reason why I suggest this is because your current TV is bottlenecking you in terms of the services you are getting from Verizon. Your DVR does not require any hardware or price changes in order to give you HD; your TV is the only limitation. Likewise, as long as you have the FiOS TV Premier (I think? from a few years ago) package, or any of the currently-available packages (Prime HD, Extreme HD, Ultimate HD), then you get all the HD channels for the SD channels that you get at no additional cost (and like I said, there is no new equipment needed because every Verizon DVR is by default an HD DVR, at no extra cost). So if you are only using a non-HD TV, then you are basically wasting money. That is just the nature of Verizon. If you were on a regular cable system, then they would provide a basic/expanded basic cable package (1-99 usually) in analog for people without HDTV's, and then any digital set-top boxes or HD channels are an add-on from the base price. For Verizon, they have an all-digital, mostly-encypted system that requires set-top boxes on all TVs, HD or not. So if you do not have an HDTV, you are still paying for the access to HD in most cases, which makes it a wise investment to buy an HDTV and get the full benefit.

 

If you do end up going that route, I would suggest composite from the DVR to the DVD/VCR, then composite from the DVD/VCR to the TV. Then I would suggest HDMI from the DVR to the TV. You can call Verizon and ask them for an HDMI cable for free (they ship to your house them with any set-top boxes you order after installation), or if that doesn't work, you can find one for cheap online. This is a cheap solution: https://teleproducts.verizon.com/fios/index.cfm/eh/DisplayDetails

View solution in original post

Highlighted
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎05-22-2010

Re: No wiring diagram for my model DVR

Message 3 of 3
(3,467 Views)

BINGO!  That was just the ticket!

 

Thanks so much for your help!

 

Sorry about the terminology discrepancy, I used what was on the wiring diagram since I didn't know the correct term for the R/W/Y connectors.

 

Yes, I do have an ancient TV that is not HD.  I'm trying to put off getting a new flat screen until after a move that --  I hope --  is coming shortly.  I'd rather buy the new one where I'll be living rather than move it.  This old faithful one will get left behind and probably become a science project for someone under 10 that's curious about ancient artifacts - LOL!

 

I've printed off your very clear explanantion and will keep it with the rest of my moving papers.  Hopefully it will be straightforward to set up the new system, but you never know.

 

Thanks again!

 

 

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