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Rev 3 cablecards?

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philhu
Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-21-2008

Rev 3 cablecards?

Message 1 of 5
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Is FiOS planning to implement the dongle or Rev 3 multistream cablecard so a 3rd party DVR, like TIVO, can get ON DEMAND?

 

I know there is only talk of this, but will FiOS seriously use the new cards?

4 REPLIES 4
KenAF
Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 585
Registered: ‎10-22-2008

Re: Rev 3 cablecards?

Message 2 of 5
(4,253 Views)

@philhu wrote:

Is FiOS planning to implement the dongle or Rev 3 multistream cablecard so a 3rd party DVR, like TIVO, can get ON DEMAND?

 

I know there is only talk of this, but will FiOS seriously use the new cards?


There is no such thing.  There are no new CableCards.  CableCards are access cards and serve two purposes: (1) decrypt the encrypted signal, and (2) receive the cable company's channel map which matches every QAM number to its "official" channel lineup number.  CableCards have nothing to do with two-way communication or On Demand.


It sounds like you are thinking of tru2way.  tru2way uses the existing CableCards, but requires that hardware manufacturers implement a cable modem and Java virtual machine.   The cable modem -- not the CableCard -- is used to communicate with the cable company to download and run a Java version of the cable company's software.  The cable company's Java (tru2way) software would have the same interface, menus, EPG and guide data, and VOD as the cable company box.  This capability can never be brought to existing TiVo and Moxi boxes, because they don't have the built-in cable modem.


TiVo would like to build a new box with tru2way support, but there are a lot of roadblocks that make it difficult.  Running the TiVo software and the cable company's Java (tru2way) software in the background, at the same time, requires more processing power and memory.  Some cable company's still don't have the Java versions of their software available, and some that is available is buggy and slow.  The tru2way licensing agreement also imposes all sorts of terms on those that want to implement that functionality.


The tru2way licensing agreement -- which all manufacturers must agree to before they can implement the functionality -- restricts menu and graphical overlays on top of the cable company UI and menus, so as not to interfere with the cable company software "experience."  The agreement also restricts integration of Internet content when tru2way functionality is used, to prevent online content (like Netflix, Vudu, Hulu, Youtube, etc) from competing with cable company content.  A company like TiVo wants to integrate Internet, broadcast, and cable (including VOD) content, and the CableLabs' tru2way requirements make that very difficult.


 

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spacedebris
Gold Contributor V
Gold Contributor V
Posts: 1,692
Registered: ‎05-17-2009

Re: Rev 3 cablecards?

Message 3 of 5
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Besides what ken said (great explanation BTW), the cable companies (including Verizon, Dish, and DTV) dont want the third party devices to have access to their interactive features. Thats the whole point of having those features, to make it "special". The companies want you to use THEIR equipment, not the 3rd party stuff, so all the systems like VOD and such are done in such a way that if you want it, you must use their equipment.

 

Right now they can claim that the 3rd party equipement are not able to get the interactive systems. And they are for the most part correct right now. But thats just the excuse they use now. WHEN the 3rd party devices are able to do it, then the cable companies will start implementing fees for all those features. They will never GIVE the features to the 3rd party devices. They will always make it as difficult or as expensive as possible to use 3rd party devices to discourage the use of said devices.




====================================================================================

Error exists between keyboard and chair.
philhu
Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-21-2008

Re: Rev 3 cablecards?

Message 4 of 5
(4,138 Views)

That's pretty much what I thought.  I just thought I'd throw it out there.

 

I drank the Kool-aid.   I now have 2 TivoHD AND a cable box for the VOD

 

I then took the hdmi and put it out to a HDMI Splitter (HDCP compatible), one goes to my big tv, one goes by WIRELESS HD (BV-2500 new HD wireless box!) to my upstairs bedroom in full HDMI HD.

 

The composite out the back goes to a modulator that 'broadcasts' the signal way up on old channel 124.  Not the raw cable line, but one split off at old chnl 85, with 6 channels, of all my equipment modulated on 92, 100, 105, 110, 115, 124.  So I can watch it anywhere in my house.  Yes, I have a 3 Harmony 890 Pro RF remotes!

 

So to make a long story short, I now have VOD on all my TV's in the house, even the hot tub room!!

KenAF
Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 585
Registered: ‎10-22-2008

Re: Rev 3 cablecards?

Message 5 of 5
(4,110 Views)

 


@spacedebris wrote:

Besides what ken said (great explanation BTW), the cable companies (including Verizon, Dish, and DTV) dont want the third party devices to have access to their interactive features. Thats the whole point of having those features, to make it "special". The companies want you to use THEIR equipment, not the 3rd party stuff, so all the systems like VOD and such are done in such a way that if you want it, you must use their equipment.

 

Right now they can claim that the 3rd party equipement are not able to get the interactive systems. And they are for the most part correct right now. But thats just the excuse they use now. WHEN the 3rd party devices are able to do it, then the cable companies will start implementing fees for all those features. They will never GIVE the features to the 3rd party devices. They will always make it as difficult or as expensive as possible to use 3rd party devices to discourage the use of said devices.


It's less about using their equipment and more about interface and content control.

 

tru2way makes it relatively easy (albeit still expensive with current technology) for a CE manufacturer to build a box that will run the cable company software.   It does not help a manufacturer build a box with a different interface, and specifically restricts how other interfaces can operate.  It restricts or prohibits integration of Internet content with cable company content.   Cable companies don't want customers seeing all the free content available elsewhere, nor do they want customers seeing alternatives to their PPV and PPV VOD services like Netflix, Hulu, Vudu, and the like.  They want customers to remain dependent on their own pay content; from their perspective, that's just good business sense.

 


@philhu wrote:

 

So to make a long story short, I now have VOD on all my TV's in the house, even the hot tub room!!


Sounds like a nice setup.


If you haven't already, be sure to see the TiVo Tips section of the TivoHD FAQ.

 

You might want to use the tip #134J to create a single recording for new series pilots.

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