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Router location / configuration problem

Router location / configuration problem

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Contributor XSi
Contributor
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎11-22-2008
Message 1 of 8
(2,334 Views)

I have Fios Internet (only Internet) for about 3 years. When the tecnician came (3 years back) to install Fios, I asked him to run a Cat5 cable from the ONT to where my ethernet switch is (a closet in a basement room) (The reason is I wanted to make sure I could use my own router in case the ActionTec went bad). So he did... From the ONT a Cat5 to the ActionTec router.... and we are happy.

 

Now we want Fios TV. The problem is that there is no coax outlet anywhere near the ActionTec router. The tv coax connection is all the way on the other side of the house.

 

What are my options?

1) Can he run a new coax cable from the ONT directly to the tv outlet and keep my internet connection the way it is (does Fios TV needs a router)?

2) Can he install a second router for TV and have both working at the same time?

 

any other idea?

 

Thanks

 

7 REPLIES 7
Gold Contributor VII Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 1,759
Registered: ‎05-22-2010
Message 2 of 8
(2,325 Views)

@XSi wrote:

I have Fios Internet (only Internet) for about 3 years. When the tecnician came (3 years back) to install Fios, I asked him to run a Cat5 cable from the ONT to where my ethernet switch is (a closet in a basement room) (The reason is I wanted to make sure I could use my own router in case the ActionTec went bad). So he did... From the ONT a Cat5 to the ActionTec router.... and we are happy.

 

Now we want Fios TV. The problem is that there is no coax outlet anywhere near the ActionTec router. The tv coax connection is all the way on the other side of the house.

 

What are my options?

1) Can he run a new coax cable from the ONT directly to the tv outlet and keep my internet connection the way it is (does Fios TV needs a router)?

2) Can he install a second router for TV and have both working at the same time?

 

any other idea?

 

Thanks

 


Is your router still the one supplied by Verizon.  If so no need for a second router.


He will run a coax from the ONT to the STB near the TV.  The STB will communicate via COAX to the ONT and then to the Verizon router over ethernet cable.  Communications to a verizon router is necessary for some basic functions fo FIOS TV.

Contributor XSi
Contributor
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎11-22-2008
Message 3 of 8
(2,298 Views)

Yes... The ActionTec router is still conencted and working... I use my own router behind the ActionTec...

 

This is great news... Hopefully performance will not be affected by this long round trip...

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Gold Contributor VII Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 1,953
Registered: ‎05-27-2010
Message 4 of 8
(2,277 Views)

That's not correct there tns ... Since the ethernet running from the ONT to the router is carrying only the WAN portion of the traffic (unlike the coax which can carry both the LAN and WAN signals using two different frequencies), you need to have the router connected via Coax in order order for the STB's (which use the MoCA LAN portion) to be able to bridge to the LAN side of the router.

 

While it's not necessary to move the WAN portion of the traffic off of the ethernet to install FiOS TV, you absolutely need to have the MoCA LAN portion of the router connected to the Coax.  In installations such as this, both the WAN ethernet and a Coax are connected to the router.  (Most installations don't use the WAN ethernet, instead just using a single coax cable for both WAN and LAN traffic -- one at 1000Mhz and the other at 1100Mhz).

 

The STB's use the MoCA LAN interface to route thru the router to the internet in order to pickup guide data, etc.

 

Long story short ... you need to also have a Coax outlet near where your router is located.

Gold Contributor VII Gold Contributor VII
Gold Contributor VII
Posts: 1,759
Registered: ‎05-22-2010
Message 5 of 8
(2,275 Views)

Hmm, two coax runs.  Never knew both a ethernet and coax were needed to the router in such setups.  Thanks for the correction Lasagna.

Platinum Contributor III
Platinum Contributor III
Posts: 6,819
Registered: ‎08-23-2008
Message 6 of 8
(2,234 Views)

@tns wrote:

Hmm, two coax runs.  Never knew both a ethernet and coax were needed to the router in such setups.  Thanks for the correction Lasagna.



Mine was like that at day one, before TV was launched I had a netgear router at 15/2. The Actiontec replaced it when TV was launched. I had the Ethernet left the way it was when the TV was hooked up. The old ONT 610X does not support MOCA on the COAX, so the MOCA received the IP through the router bridge from Ethernet side of the router. ONT Ethernet Wan and MOCA COAX connected to router. I went 35/35 and was upgraded to the ONT 612 and told the tech not to touch a thing, and made sure my IP stayed on Ethernet out of the ONT.

 

Good info. Back when 5/2 I believe, and 15/2 were all that were offered.

Gold Contributor IV
Gold Contributor IV
Posts: 1,416
Registered: ‎04-10-2012
Message 7 of 8
(2,218 Views)

My recent Triple Play install (which seems flawless so far) left me wondering if there might be a better layout for the coax runs.  Yes, I know "if it ain't broke ..." but ...  BTW all the network components are mounted on a central panel in the basement and all cables are home-run to the panel, so changes are straightforward.  A photo of the layout has been uploaded to my profile on these forums.

 

We are using a coax WAN connection.  Coax runs from the ONT to an 8-port splitter supplied by Verizon.  The tech mentioned that this splitter provides an 11 dB drop at each output.  Six of the splitter outputs feed TV locations throughout the house, and a seventh output from the splitter feeds the Actiontec (Revision 3I) router.  The Actiontec is in turn connected LAN-to-LAN to an Asus RT-N16 configured as a fixed IP wireless access point.  The Asus is in there because I prefer it for wireless, and it affords USB mass storage.  It also feeds a large-array gigabit switch for the LAN network.

 

My question is this: would it not be better to initially split the coax from the ONT using a 2-way splitter?  I.e.,  first go directly to the Actiontec (and on to the LAN) on one leg, and then feed the TV distribution on the other leg (using for example the existing Verizon 8-port splitter)?  This change would seem to give a potentially better signal to the LAN side, a practice that was always suggested in earlier wiring setups from Comcast.  I have not actually measured the signal strengths on the coax, but am merely speculating on (infinitesimal) improvements.  Thanks.

MVP CRobGauth MVP
MVP
Posts: 7,713
Registered: ‎11-04-2008
Message 8 of 8
(2,192 Views)

Unless you are having problems with your Internet speed, it will make things worse. You have added an extra 3 dB to all STBs (which can suffer from low signal). So unless you can reduce the 8 way down to something smaller, no advantage.


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