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Can I Connect My DSL Modem to a Surge Protector?

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Copper Contributor
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Registered: ‎09-27-2018

Can I Connect My DSL Modem to a Surge Protector?

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Hello,

I am curious because I hear different opinions on this and not sure what the fact is. My dsl modem is directly connected into the wall socket. I have been told that is what you are suppose to do. Now, I was wondering if it was better to plug it into a surge protector with all my other computer equipment. I have heard that is is okay to do this and will not harm anything. Anyone know that actual answer here? I would think the surge protector would be better because if you have a lightning strike or something like that, it would protector your modem. If I am wrong, that is okay.

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Registered: ‎12-02-2012

Re: Can I Connect My DSL Modem to a Surge Protector?

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Are you talking about mains power?  If so, go ahead and plug the power supply into a surge protector.  It won't impact DSL performance.

 

If you're talking about putting a surge protector on the phone line, be careful.  Make sure the protector is designed to allow DSL signals to pass, otherwise it will interfere with operation.

 

All that said, know that any surge protector is only as good as it's ground.  Since the ground on a wall socket goes through a long wire and possible several connections, it isn't that great.  This means that power strip surge protectors are of limited value.  If you want true surge protection, install one on the electrical panel where the ground is thick wire with a short run to physical ground rod.

 

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Re: Can I Connect My DSL Modem to a Surge Protector?

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Are you talking about mains power?  If so, go ahead and plug the power supply into a surge protector.  It won't impact DSL performance.

 

If you're talking about putting a surge protector on the phone line, be careful.  Make sure the protector is designed to allow DSL signals to pass, otherwise it will interfere with operation.

 

All that said, know that any surge protector is only as good as it's ground.  Since the ground on a wall socket goes through a long wire and possible several connections, it isn't that great.  This means that power strip surge protectors are of limited value.  If you want true surge protection, install one on the electrical panel where the ground is thick wire with a short run to physical ground rod.

 

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Copper Contributor
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Registered: ‎09-27-2018

Re: Can I Connect My DSL Modem to a Surge Protector?

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I as referring to the power, not the line. I have limit amount of plugs and was just trying to consolidate. We have a whole how surge protector installed. Not a big deal either way. Thanks for the reply.

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Copper Contributor
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Registered: ‎05-06-2013

Re: Can I Connect My DSL Modem to a Surge Protector?

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Where is this "ground panel" to which you refer located? Working in close contact with electrical connections sounds like a job for an electrician, to avoid electrocution.

 

I bought a surge protector which resembles a power strip, but claims to be a true surge protector, not just a device offering more outlets. The manufacturer of the product claims a $50,000 insurance policy if any electrical equipment is destroyed from lightning strikes, etc. while plugged into its product. Is this a hoax?

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Re: Can I Connect My DSL Modem to a Surge Protector?

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@jimmo wrote:

Where is this "ground panel" to which you refer located? Working in close contact with electrical connections sounds like a job for an electrician, to avoid electrocution.

 

I bought a surge protector which resembles a power strip, but claims to be a true surge protector, not just a device offering more outlets. The manufacturer of the product claims a $50,000 insurance policy if any electrical equipment is destroyed from lightning strikes, etc. while plugged into its product. Is this a hoax?


The electrical panel is the big metal box with circuit breakers.  In a typical residential install, there is one panel.  It has a thick ground wire running outside the building to a physical spike in the ground (thus the name.)  This is a very good ground.

 

Surge protectors are only as good as their path to ground.  When a surge occurs, they shunt the excess current to ground, but if the ground is a long thin wire that goes through several connections, the result is a sudden rise in ground voltage due to the huge current passing through the resistance of the connections.  This creates additional problems.  Most residential outlet grounds are just that; long thin wires with lots of connections.

 

The best surge protection is installed on the electrical panel due to it's very low resistance path to ground.  A panel installed protector will clamp any voltage that comes in from the outside before it gets inside.  Installing one isn't too hard, but it is a job for an electrician or someone who understands how to safely work inside an electrical panel.

 

Power strip protectors provide some protection, but nowhere near as much as a panel mounted device.  The protected equipment insurance policies are just that - insurance.  You may be able to recover some money if equipment is damaged, but wouldn't you rather have a system that provides significantly better protection?

 

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