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Download up to 3 Mbps / Upload up to 768 Kbps?

Download up to 3 Mbps / Upload up to 768 Kbps?

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Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎05-21-2009
Message 1 of 10
(14,844 Views)
 I upgraded to the Power plan for download up to 3 Mbps / Upload up to 768 Kbps. The thing is that when I download any files I'm only getting around 192KB. Shouldn't I have at least 350kb? Or did I just pay an extra $10 for an extra 100KB. I'm using a Actiontec GT704WG as a router and I have no firewall. I'm pretty sure it doesn't have anything to do with malware or viruses since I've scanned and whatnot.
Message Edited by poonagez on 05-21-2009 07:52 PM
9 REPLIES 9
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Silver Contributor III
Silver Contributor III
Posts: 497
Registered: ‎05-21-2009
Message 2 of 10
(14,802 Views)

On a wired PC, go to www.speakeasy.net/speedtest click the closest server, run the test

 

that will show you your speeds that you are pulling

 

downloading files is not only dependent on how fast you can download, but also how fast the uplodaer or host can upload to you... not to mention everything between you and where you are downloading the file from....

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bob Robertson - Lighter Klepto - I steal lighters, not bandwith
Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 116
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
Message 3 of 10
(14,783 Views)

DSL performance is very sensitive to the quality and length of the copper pair that connect you to the CO. The first thing to check is the logs on your modem/route and see what the underlying rate that the modem has been able to negotiate with CO equipment. So go to http://192.168.1.1 and login in as the administrator and look at the log. It will tell you what the negotiate uplink, downlink and link losses are. Those speeds represents the maximum transmission rates available to you, and due to the condition of the copper pair between you and the CO, can be considerable less than 3mbs/768kb. 

 

That rate is the maximum possible rate you will see, and it can vary with conditions. I am an ex-DSL customer. Basically If I could hear thunder, my DSL service was out, and a good rainstorm cut 500kbps out of the downlink speed which wasn't that great to begin with.

 

I moved to FiOS finally. That solved both the weather and performance problem FiOS is pretty much an all or nothing proposition. You either get the rated performance, you you get nothing.

 

Interestingly enough my landline is still copper however. Voice service operates quite well even on copper pair that don't work well for DSL.

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Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎07-13-2009
Message 4 of 10
(13,989 Views)
Interesting that your line went out in the rain. My dial tone went out in the rain after turning to loud static the phone was permanently off hook until the tech showed up over a week later, all the time I had DSL albeit at a reduced speed 300/300 while paying for 3000.
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Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎07-13-2009
Message 5 of 10
(13,981 Views)

I have paid for 3.0 / 768

 

My Westell modem says from 192.168.1.1  1792/448

 

speakeasy gives  1540 / 383

 

I guess they lowered my speed to 1.5 when I asked them but figured they would just keep on charging for 3000 / 768 since they don't guarantee speed.

 

I think this is par for the course with Verizon. Why should they be trustworthy when they make more money by playing with peoples heads.

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Silver Contributor V
Silver Contributor V
Posts: 668
Registered: ‎10-26-2008
Message 6 of 10
(13,977 Views)

The Westell is politely telling you that the copper pair between you and the CO isn't very good. That may be due to distance, age, or a combination of both.Unfortunately DSL is not a tariffed service, so Verizon has no obligation to improve the copper pair for you. (By contrast voice service is tariffed, and if the copper pair isn't good enough to support voice, Verizon is required to fix it).

 

The short answer is you aren't ever going to get 3.0/768 out of that copper pair, so it makes no sense to pay service you cannot get. That is the long and the short of why I went to FiOS when offered (and interestingly enough, I still have the copper pair for the landline).

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Copper Contributor
Copper Contributor
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎07-22-2009
Message 7 of 10
(13,610 Views)

Weather should never be affecting your DSL unless a pole is hit by lightining; phone lines need to be protected from normal emf

which includes weather related interference.  Current DSL technology, ADSL 2+, will permit speeds of upto 20Mps. This can be

extended for miles by placing a line conditioner at the point of maximum resistance on the copper.  For me to buy a line conditioner

it would cost about $60 so for Verizon it would probably be around $0.60.  The line conditioner is powered by the existing phone 

line so it's an inexpensive and clean solution.

 

 

 

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Silver Contributor V
Silver Contributor V
Posts: 668
Registered: ‎10-26-2008
Message 8 of 10
(13,595 Views)

Beg to differ. While Weather shouldn't impact the line, in older lines it often does.

 

You need to keep in mind that for telephone calls, the copper pair can be viewed as a DC circuit. For DSL service, it is a radio frequency transmission line. With older insulation types, especially if the plasticizer starts to migrate, the dielectric characteristics of the insulation can change quite dramatically in bad weather, and that can very adversely impact the Radio Frequency transmission line characteristics. When I had DSL, I lost 500kbps on the downlink everytime it rained, and if I could hear thunder, my DSL service was down. The copper pair that serves my house terminates on an old porcelain block. My guess is the line from the house to the CO is the far side of 50 years old, and the insulating and dielectric properties of that insulation are a lot different now then were 50+ years ago, and the losses go up dramatically when the insulation gets wet.

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Copper Contributor
Copper Contributor
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎07-22-2009
Message 9 of 10
(13,582 Views)

You are right and, sorry, I didn't mean to question the veracity of what you're saying.  However what you describe is not a normal situation.  if the insulation/wire is in that bad a shape that "normal" weather is affecting it, it should be replaced.  I don't know the chemistry of the coating used on copper phone lines today, never mind decades ago, but if insulation has deteriorated to the point where normal weather is affecting transmission characteristic the line needs to be replaced.  From your description of the wiring, it may actually pose a greater hazard than simply dsl consequences.

 

Enjoy the day!

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Silver Contributor V
Silver Contributor V
Posts: 668
Registered: ‎10-26-2008
Message 10 of 10
(13,575 Views)

While the copper pair probably should be replaced, unless it impacts landline telephone service, it won't be. The telephone service is tariffed, and must meet certain technical standards to be within the tariff. The insulation and dielectric characteristics can change a lot, and it won't be enough to make the voice service out of tariff. ISDN is also a tariffed service, so if it changes enough to impact ISDN (much easier to impact than voice), Verizon would also be obligated to repair it if you had ISDN service.

 

DSL however is not a tariffed service, and is not subject to regulatory oversight, as a result, Verizon can (and does) take the position that if it doesn't work well enough, too bad. The reality is Verizon isn't going to put any more money into copper than they absolutely have too. So if the Voice and/or ISDN service meets the tariff requirements, that is all Verizon has to do. If that isn't adequate for DSL, tough luck.

 

I suspect the condition of the local copper had a lot to do with Verizon's decision to offer FiOS in the neighborhood.

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