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Hacking Fibre Optic Service

Hacking Fibre Optic Service

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Contributor
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Posts: 1
Registered: ‎06-24-2014
Message 11 of 17
(2,657 Views)

      I hate to be a naysayer and in general find no fault with any of the comments here. My history includes several years of telecomm exp and ranges from working with & for the FBI and other related agencies, mostly in tapping and bugging. I was involved in both R&D and actual field work but usually only from the warehouses, etc., not on-scene.

 

   That's why I felt compelled to respond here. For reasons I'll get into in a sec, there is no such thing as 100% security nor that it takes $$$$$ to achieve it.  It's very possible to cheaply "rent" or hire people to do these jobs.

 

   It wasn't well covered, but most of what was mentioned indicated the use of wires to tap with. Actually, if ANYTHING digital is in operation, it is often possibile to nstall pretty cheap (even surplus equip) to "hear" what's going on in an enclosed area, plus sensitive receivers can be placed to pick up and record anything digital going on in any enclosure.  No wires - just simple RF and digital taps.  The information can either be broadcase to the listener, or recorded and may have to be picked up periodically and be brought in for decoding. 

 

   There is more to it, but my point is it doesn't take mega dollars to acquire the equipment.

 

   One other thng never me ntioned was that such suspicions should always be reported to local law enforcement. They won't be able to help at all, but the value of the reporting is to show when you first suspected it, and later if need be would have public records to back up your future claims.

   The things I've me ntioned are also illegal, so ... any future evidence might need the past records to substantiate part of the claim.  For details for a well seasoned reader, see the FCC requirements for telephone use and implementation and enforcement.  It used to be in Section 68, Part 47 but that may have been changed to something more modern, I don't know.

 

   If I were a licensed PI, I think I would have better places to get information than from this board, in all honesty, since you are playing with Federal Law when you talk about tapping, bugg9ing, et al.

 

 

 

Nickel Contributor
Nickel Contributor
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎03-15-2011
Message 12 of 17
(2,654 Views)

@tns_2 wrote:

As far as how easy to break security you didn't specify what generation of phone you are talking about.  Some, even digital phones, had no security.  Those are relatively easy to receive and the early security is also commonly hacked. However even the currently common DECT phones have security that has been broken.  Fortunately for those with security, its not that easy to do.  More likely some other means being used if they really are getting your phone calls.

 

As someone previously mentioned tapping your copper wire somewhere is easy.


The Magic Jack Wireless Handset is Panasonic Model Number KX-TGA660  -  # of handsets = 1  5.4 Ghz DECT 6

The Verizon Fios Wireless Handset is Panasonic Model Number KX-TGA931T # of handsets = 6  2.4 Ghz DECT 6

 

All are secure behind locked gates and property doors. 

 

It would be interesting to know how to detect wireless intrusion to these devices.  There has just been too many things

that I can no longer write off as coinkydink's

 

Dev

 

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Nickel Contributor
Nickel Contributor
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎03-15-2011
Message 13 of 17
(2,652 Views)

I do understand where your coming from but I am not asking how to do it but how to prevent it.   What I have gained here has been helpful

 

dev

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Nickel Contributor
Nickel Contributor
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎03-15-2011
Message 14 of 17
(2,651 Views)

@twyner wrote:

      I hate to be a naysayer and in general find no fault with any of the comments here. My history includes several years of telecomm exp and ranges from working with & for the FBI and other related agencies, mostly in tapping and bugging. I was involved in both R&D and actual field work but usually only from the warehouses, etc., not on-scene.

 

   That's why I felt compelled to respond here. For reasons I'll get into in a sec, there is no such thing as 100% security nor that it takes $$$$$ to achieve it.  It's very possible to cheaply "rent" or hire people to do these jobs.

 

   It wasn't well covered, but most of what was mentioned indicated the use of wires to tap with. Actually, if ANYTHING digital is in operation, it is often possibile to nstall pretty cheap (even surplus equip) to "hear" what's going on in an enclosed area, plus sensitive receivers can be placed to pick up and record anything digital going on in any enclosure.  No wires - just simple RF and digital taps.  The information can either be broadcase to the listener, or recorded and may have to be picked up periodically and be brought in for decoding. 

 

   There is more to it, but my point is it doesn't take mega dollars to acquire the equipment.

 

   One other thng never me ntioned was that such suspicions should always be reported to local law enforcement. They won't be able to help at all, but the value of the reporting is to show when you first suspected it, and later if need be would have public records to back up your future claims.

   The things I've me ntioned are also illegal, so ... any future evidence might need the past records to substantiate part of the claim.  For details for a well seasoned reader, see the FCC requirements for telephone use and implementation and enforcement.  It used to be in Section 68, Part 47 but that may have been changed to something more modern, I don't know.

 

   If I were a licensed PI, I think I would have better places to get information than from this board, in all honesty, since you are playing with Federal Law when you talk about tapping, bugg9ing, et al.

 

 

 


I totally respect what you are saying, and have reported to law enforcement,  they really dont seem to give a rats **bleep**. 

But yeah I know the T word and the H word are very sensitive in forums like this and I try to use them sparingly and in the proper context.   Believe me I do not care about know how to do this just preventing it

 

Thanks for your input

Dev

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Platinum Contributor III Platinum Contributor III
Platinum Contributor III
Posts: 7,424
Registered: ‎12-15-2010
Message 15 of 17
(2,591 Views)

To put this on the record, the data stream between the Verizon ONT and the Central office is encrypted (no idea what the algorithm is), so even if your neighbor is on the same PON as you are, decrypting your information would require expensive equipment and plenty of patience.

 

If you are worried, avoid using Wireless communications. Cabling up is the best way to stay secure. Encrypt your traffic wherever possible. HTTPS Everywhere is a good browser plug-in to use to ensure Encryption is forced when possible. VPNs are good, too. Just avoid IPSec VPNs. If you use VoIP rather than FiOS Phone, you can consider tunnelling the VoIP traffic through a VPN if you have VoIP setup on a PC, or a capable router.

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Nickel Contributor
Nickel Contributor
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎03-15-2011
Message 16 of 17
(2,588 Views)

@tns_2 wrote:

As far as how easy to break security you didn't specify what generation of phone you are talking about.  Some, even digital phones, had no security.  Those are relatively easy to receive and the early security is also commonly hacked. However even the currently common DECT phones have security that has been broken.  Fortunately for those with security, its not that easy to do.  More likely some other means being used if they really are getting your phone calls.

 

As someone previously mentioned tapping your copper wire somewhere is easy.


Ok, I have the 2014 model Panasonic 5.4 Ghz wireless phones,  There is no open access to any copper outside the walls of the dwelling.  As my fiber and ONT are terminated inside the house in a closet, and all of the copper is running under the house. 

 

There just has just been too many coinkydinks in conversations lately,  I am assuming it is probably the wireless handsets themselves.  it seems to be the most logical.

 

Dev

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Nickel Contributor
Nickel Contributor
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎03-15-2011
Message 17 of 17
(2,587 Views)

@Smith6612 wrote:

To put this on the record, the data stream between the Verizon ONT and the Central office is encrypted (no idea what the algorithm is), so even if your neighbor is on the same PON as you are, decrypting your information would require expensive equipment and plenty of patience.

 

If you are worried, avoid using Wireless communications. Cabling up is the best way to stay secure. Encrypt your traffic wherever possible. HTTPS Everywhere is a good browser plug-in to use to ensure Encryption is forced when possible. VPNs are good, too. Just avoid IPSec VPNs. If you use VoIP rather than FiOS Phone, you can consider tunnelling the VoIP traffic through a VPN if you have VoIP setup on a PC, or a capable router.


I do have one VoIP service MagicJack,  that is connected to the router directly,  and works fine,  if anyone here could assist in some pointers in how to secure the VoIP connection I would be greatly appreciated.

Dev

 

I am using the ASUS AC 66U Wireless Router with Merlin firmware

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