Have You Done Anything Outrageous Lately?

Have You Done Anything Outrageous Lately?
Employee Emeritus Employee Emeritus ‎06-07-2010 02:15 PM

1158i99C76DF3DFDC8CC9Another guest blog post from Tom Harnish and Kate Lister of WiseBread. 

 

Pubic relations is a wise way to save some bread, build credibility, attract customers, and establish your brand—to communicate what makes you special. PR is especially effective if you’re creative and willing to try something outrageous to attract attention.

 

A 50-year-old restaurant chain, Dreamland, for example, was losing customers so to liven things up they ran their dead founder for Governor of Alabama. They held rallies and distributed all the typical political collateral you can think of. The result? TV coverage locally, and print coverage nationally; two hundred tables and 500 slabs of ribs served on rally day alone.

 

PR is cheap and effective, and can be used by:

 

  • entrepreneurs starting a business,
  • an owner who runs a small company,
  • a freelancer,
  • someone looking for a job, or
  • an employee ready to upgrade a career

 

to

 

  • tell neighbors you've just opened a new store,
  • attract customers to a special sale,
  • tell website owners you're available to give their place a new look,
  • attract the attention of a company you want to work for, or
  • communicate to your boss that you're ready for a promotion.

 

Most people, I suspect, think PR is what you do when you send out news releases and mail press kits, and those are two of the tools you can use. But if you’re willing to be a little offbeat, there's a way to use PR directly for fun and profit.

 

In fact, we're going to focus on the fun and profit part of public relations in a free webinar presented by the Verizon Small Business Center on Wednesday, June 9th from 2:00 to 3:00 pm EDT.

 

My experience tells me the more fun you have doing it, the more effective it will be. We'll explain in more detail during the webinar; but here's an example:

 

After leaving a job as a new product development director for a computer company I needed some way to attract attention to my resume. As a former Navy flyer I knew that the French Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) and the National Aeronautic Association here in the U.S. kept track of international and national aviation records.

 

With a little digging I discovered that speed records "over a recognized course" (between cities) was something they tracked. Better yet, I discovered no one had established a record between my hometown and a city I often visited to see in-laws. I didn't even have to break a record; I could just set one and be a world record holder.

 

There's isn't an HR person or hiring manager anywhere that won't be intrigued by the phrase "world record holder" on a resume.

 

I applied for what is curiously called a Sporting License from the FAI, arranged for official observers to record the time off and time on, and claimed a new world record. The 32-year-old aircraft we owned didn’t go all that fast, so on the side of the aircraft we later painted, "FAI World Speed Record Holder. 448,573.44 furlongs per fortnight."

 

The stunt worked, too. I skipped a couple of rungs of the corporate ladder, accepted a position as President of a start-up medical software company, and had fun getting there. 

 

Tune in this Wednesday, boys and girls, when that lovable, exciting, aviation hero, ‘Tailspin’ Tommy and flying friend ‘Cash Register’ Kate will tell you more about:

 

  • What Kind of PR Can Work For You
  • Why You Want To Be News
  • Who To Tell
  • How To Measure Results
  • Where You'll Find Resources To Help

 

 

Sign up for this free webinar presented by the Verizon Small Business Center this  Wednesday, June 9th, 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern (pre-registration required so sign up now!).

Comments
Copper Contributor

i enjoyed so much for reading this article thank u so much and hope u a wonderful day

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Contact the editor: tumara.r.jordan@verizon.com

About the Authors

Tumara Jordan

Senior Manager: Verizon Business Markets

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Tumara is a contributor to the Business Markets Marketing team and she currently manages Social Media marketing campaigns.


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