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Verizon FIOS is anti consumer

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beachboyatom
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Registered: ‎01-01-2021

Verizon FIOS is anti consumer

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Obsolete technology because Verizon FIOS stopped investing in newer Optical Modems. Customers usually can’t go beyond MOCA 1.1 (175 m/bits) because of these old Optical Modems. Such a failure. This technology should be invested in, because it is easy to wire a house with coaxial and ethernet switches, rather than putting a dozen RJ-45 wires all over the house. This must have been done by corporate.

 

 

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Cang_Household
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Registered: ‎09-06-2020

Re: Verizon FIOS is anti consumer

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Optical modems? Repeat after me: Fios uses Optical Network Terminal (ONT for short)... 😊

 

Regarding your opinion, I concur in part and dissent in part.

 

ONT and the router Coax WAN stay on the WAN side of the home network. For in-house network distribution, it should be on the LAN side of the home network. Verizon routers support later MoCA versions on the LAN side. BHR 4 supports MoCA 2.0 (500Mbps+) and BHR 5 supports MoCA 2.5 (2500Mbps+). If you only have coax wires running to each room, you can use MoCA LAN to create a pretty fast home network.

 

I use MoCA LAN to create the backbone of my network. I have 5 coax wires to the first and second floors. I use an ECB5240M (bonded MoCA 2.0, 1000Mbps+) in the basement to feed a BHR 4 router on the second floor and a WCB3000N on the first floor. Then Ethernet wires being terminated at each floor's MoCA bridge.

 

You are interested in a faster MoCA WAN link between the ONT and the router. Given older ONTs do not support later MoCA versions due to their manufacturing date, newer ONTs are typically indoor for residential installs and are typically closer to the router. If you want to place the router further away from the ONT and run your own wire, why not directly run a few Ethernet cables?

 

If you need planning and technical help for your situation, please state your situation and we can help you here too.

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jonjones
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Registered: ‎10-18-2016

Re: Verizon FIOS is anti consumer

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And you know this how? What you are actually doing is venting an opinion.

for the most part it works as it should. It is still the industry leader and cost wise it still is the best bang for the buck.

 

but you have a right to a opposite opinion.

 

Edg1
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Registered: ‎06-24-2018

Re: Verizon FIOS is anti consumer

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I agree with you that it would make things easier in some situations to utilize MoCA 2.5 from the ONT to the router. However, to make the argument for the other side, the ability to use ethernet gives many users the ability to use their own router and not have to rent one from verizon. 

 


@beachboyatom wrote:

because it is easy to wire a house with coaxial and ethernet switches, rather than putting a dozen RJ-45 wires all over the house.


 How is one easier than the other? Running wire is running wire period. It doesn't matter whether you are using ethernet or coax. Also the proper way of running them is exactly the same. With homeruns all going back to a single termination point for a cable splitter or ethernet switch.  

Cang_Household
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Posts: 1,700
Registered: ‎09-06-2020

Re: Verizon FIOS is anti consumer

Message 4 of 4
(1,212 Views)

Optical modems? Repeat after me: Fios uses Optical Network Terminal (ONT for short)... 😊

 

Regarding your opinion, I concur in part and dissent in part.

 

ONT and the router Coax WAN stay on the WAN side of the home network. For in-house network distribution, it should be on the LAN side of the home network. Verizon routers support later MoCA versions on the LAN side. BHR 4 supports MoCA 2.0 (500Mbps+) and BHR 5 supports MoCA 2.5 (2500Mbps+). If you only have coax wires running to each room, you can use MoCA LAN to create a pretty fast home network.

 

I use MoCA LAN to create the backbone of my network. I have 5 coax wires to the first and second floors. I use an ECB5240M (bonded MoCA 2.0, 1000Mbps+) in the basement to feed a BHR 4 router on the second floor and a WCB3000N on the first floor. Then Ethernet wires being terminated at each floor's MoCA bridge.

 

You are interested in a faster MoCA WAN link between the ONT and the router. Given older ONTs do not support later MoCA versions due to their manufacturing date, newer ONTs are typically indoor for residential installs and are typically closer to the router. If you want to place the router further away from the ONT and run your own wire, why not directly run a few Ethernet cables?

 

If you need planning and technical help for your situation, please state your situation and we can help you here too.

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