Accessibility Resource Center Skip to main content
Get up to $500 when you bring your phone. Plus, get the incredible iPhone 13 Pro on us. Online only. With select 5G Unlimited plans. Ends 12.5. Buy now
end of navigation menu

The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Reply
speedo123
Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 79
Registered: ‎08-11-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 21 of 53
(7,944 Views)

@hofs1 wrote:

I can confirm with the SA8300 HD box it was widely know[n] to take any sata hd add esata case and plug it in and a popup message asked to format new storage. I did it with 2 different cases and hdd's.. it worked like a charm.

 

My BIG question is if motorola didn't have the "drivers, software , etc " to make it work then WHY put the ports (esata) on the box in the first place. Seems like a dumb waste of money if they had no use for them in the first place!!!!


 

One would think that if Motorola  put them there, they planned on using these ports at some point in time.  The problem is that their equipment, with these crippled ports, has been in use for years.  Again, as I've said in previous posts to this thread, there's NO justifiable reason for this situation to still exist.  It's inconceivable that Motorola can't enable these ports.  And it's also inconceivable that Verizon doesn't demand that Motorola do this or to even address the issue with its customers .  IMHO neither company really cares about what their customers want/need.  And it's going to come back to haunt them. With the state of the economy as it is now and the number of DVR manufacturers out there that CAN offer DVRs with large HDs as well as operable ports for external HDs, Verizon should be able to make a very favorable deal with one of them to replace these obsolete Motorola DVRs.  Has Motorola "missed the boat" the same way the American Auto Mfgrs have? 

 

Come on Verizon, tell us customers what you intend to do about this!

 

G-Pon
Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 95
Registered: ‎12-07-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 22 of 53
(7,899 Views)

If I might speculate a little here…


The lack of this ability is more related to liability than technology. The entertainment industry has lost control of their product and lost (legitimate) control over their intellectual property. As far as I know one provider only (one of the satellite ones) fully allows the off-box-storage under discussion here, if a hard drive once attached to one of their boxes never shows up in China after a copywrite investigation, of if they never get sued over this, maybe other providers will step out into the street. the Legal Eagles not the Geeks own this issue.

 

(just good speculation)

CharlesH
Employee Emeritus Employee Emeritus
Employee Emeritus
Posts: 895
Registered: ‎12-01-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 23 of 53
(7,893 Views)
That was my same thought as well,  G-Pon. By the way, I like your username lol
speedo123
Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 79
Registered: ‎08-11-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 24 of 53
(7,869 Views)

@G-Pon wrote:

If I might speculate a little here…


The lack of this ability is more related to liability than technology. The entertainment industry has lost control of their product and lost (legitimate) control over their intellectual property. As far as I know one provider only (one of the satellite ones) fully allows the off-box-storage under discussion here, if a hard drive once attached to one of their boxes never shows up in China after a copywrite investigation, of if they never get sued over this, maybe other providers will step out into the street. the Legal Eagles not the Geeks own this issue.

 

(just good speculation)


 

I think your speculation is probably pretty accurate.  However, why did the federal government require these ports be added to the equipment back in 2004 if they're never going to be activated?  But even if the legality is the problem, adding an external drive is only one way of resolving the main issue - lack of storage space.  The other way it could be resolved is to offer larger hard disks in the DVRs.  As mentioned earlier, I can now buy a 1TB hard drive suitable for video recording for less than $100 in a quantity of just one.  And you know the seller is making money on it.  So if Motorola was buying them in quantities of 10's or 100's of thousands, they'd cost a lot less than that.  Why can't Verizon require Motorola to supply larger hard drives?  It can't be a price issue any more (if it ever was!).  Giving us larger internal HDs shouldn't expose either company to any more liability than they presently have with the small (by today's standards teeeeny!) hard drives they're giving us now. 

 

Someone should check into what this 2004 federal requirement says.  One would think that it stated more than the ports had to be there.  It would seem reasonable to assume that it said what they are supposed to do, other than just be there.  Maybe they're supposed to be activated by now!  (Just a thought...)

 

Anyway, other TV Signal suppliers (both cable & satellite companies) offer their customers substantially more storage.  Why won't Verizon?  I really believe it's costing them customers.  Some people won't convert to FIOS and others leave because of this major limitation.  And then add in the other less serious problems with FIOS - the guide, operating system glitches and lack of features, it has got to be limiting their market penetration.  Maybe Verizon needs to look at this as a marketing solution to slower than predicted sales and then they'd do something other than float rumors that they're "looking into it."  Right now, I'm paying close to $40/mo for obsolete equipment.  Much as I'd hate to go through a change again, at the end of my contract with Verizon, I'm seriously considering switching to a supplier that will honor my legitimate requests for storage space, a decent guide and an operating system that's user friendly and has the features I want.  It's what's referred to as a Customer Friendly attitude.  Hey, GM, Chrysler and Ford TOLD us what we wanted car wise, and you see how well its working for them!  You should pay attention Verizon...

 

I think FIOS could be great if only Verizon would address the issues its customers have brought to their attention. and they could smooth a lot of ruffled feathers if only they would let us know what and when they planned to address these problems.

 

Oh well, time to get off my soap box. 

cprgolds
Nickel Contributor
Nickel Contributor
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎12-26-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 25 of 53
(7,864 Views)

And I think the same question goes for the Remote IR Port.  Surely there couldn't be an Intellectual Property issue with this?

 

Why can't that be active?

CharlesH
Employee Emeritus Employee Emeritus
Employee Emeritus
Posts: 895
Registered: ‎12-01-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 26 of 53
(7,861 Views)
cprgolds, it is active.  I've talked to a lot of customers that have IR "eyes" because they put their cable box in a entertainment center or something.
KenAF
Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 585
Registered: ‎10-22-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 27 of 53
(7,838 Views)

@speedo123 wrote:

I think your speculation is probably pretty accurate.  However, why did the federal government require these ports be added to the equipment back in 2004 if they're never going to be activated?


The FCC requires that every cable company make available one box with functional Firewire, for use with [older] Firewire TVs and D-VHS HDTV VCRs.  It doesn't have to be a DVR.  The FCC also requires a HDMI connection on new boxes.

 

The FCC makes does not require USB, eSATA, or any other ports.  The FCC does not require any form of drive expansion.

 


@speedo123 wrote:

But even if the legality is the problem, adding an external drive is only one way of resolving the main issue - lack of storage space.  The other way it could be resolved is to offer larger hard disks in the DVRs.  As mentioned earlier, I can now buy a 1TB hard drive suitable for video recording for less than $100 in a quantity of just one.  And you know the seller is making money on it.  So if Motorola was buying them in quantities of 10's or 100's of thousands, they'd cost a lot less than that.  Why can't Verizon require Motorola to supply larger hard drives?  It can't be a price issue any more (if it ever was!).  Giving us larger internal HDs shouldn't expose either company to any more liability than they presently have with the small (by today's standards teeeeny!) hard drives they're giving us now. 


In another thread, I noted that Motorola charged a ridiculous premium for the 120GB vs 160GB models a few years ago.

 

More than 2/3 of all DVRs deployed by cable companies in the United States are Motorola DVRs.  Can you guess how many have a >160GB hard drive?  Zero, zilch, nada.  Can you guess how many support eSATA expansion?   Zero, zilch, nada.

 

Every Motorola DVR available to customers in the United States, regardless of provider, features a maximum internal size of 160GB with no functional eSATA expansion.  There are unconfirmed reports of a 320GB model being available, but for whatever reason, not a single cable provider has purchased or deployed it.  Either it isn't available yet, or it isn't available at a reasonable cost.

 

Suppose for a moment that a Motorola DVR with a 320GB drive is actually available, albeit at a substantial premium.  Do you think Verizon wants to offer a 320GB DVR for $25-30/mo when the competition offers a 160GB DVR for $12-16/mo?  Generally, cable providers want to stick with one model at one price to simplify installs and minimize confusion for both installers and end-users.

 

As far as external drive support, it must work reliably with encryption / DRM so it is acceptable to content providers.  Unconfirmed reports from the past suggest that Motorola has not been able to make eSATA drive expansion work reliably with DRM.   Users won't tolerate drive expansion if it causes the Motorola DVR to crash constantly.  Even DirecTV couldn't make traditional eSATA expansion work reliably, so they took a different approach; when you add a eSATA drive to DirecTV DVR, it completely takes the place of the internal drive, rather than splitting every recording across both the internal and external drive.  Perhaps Motorola should look into that.

 


@speedo123 wrote:

Anyway, other TV Signal suppliers (both cable & satellite companies) offer their customers substantially more storage.  Why won't Verizon?  I really believe it's costing them customers.  Some people won't convert to FIOS and others leave because of this major limitation.  And then add in the other less serious problems with FIOS - the guide, operating system glitches and lack of features, it has got to be limiting their market penetration.  Maybe Verizon needs to look at this as a marketing solution to slower than predicted sales and then they'd do something other than float rumors that they're "looking into it."  Right now, I'm paying close to $40/mo for obsolete equipment.


There are no cable providers that currently offer Motorola or SA DVRs with larger drives than Verizon.  Brighthouse, Cablevision, Charter, Comcast, Cox, and Time Warner all use DVRs with a maximum of 160GB internal.  Some of these providers use Scientific Atlanta DVRs in select markets, which provide unofficial support for eSATA expansion today.  In two test markets, Comcast does allow users to purchase their own Panasonic True2WAY DVR with a 250GB drive for ~$400(?).

 

Dish Network offers 320GB (ViP622) and 500GB (ViP722) DVRs.  DirecTV offers 320GB (HR20/21/22) and just released a 500GB (HR23) DVR.  DirecTV charges existing customers a $199 fee up-front to get a DVR, plus a $5.99/mo DVR fee to use it, plus another $5.00/mo if they have a second receiver in their home.  DirecTV also requires that any customer activating a DVR extend their service commitment by 1-2 years.  The DirecTV DVR must be returned, with no refund, when the user cancels service; if the DVR fails, the user is responsible for buying their own replacement.  This is clearly a different business model than used by FiOS; FiOS charges $15.99 to use their DVR, but it has no upfront fee, no commitment, and they'll replace it for free if it goes bad.

 

Now, the best solution for most customers would be for Verizon to offer a 320GB or 500GB DVR.  I expect Verizon to be among the first cable companies to offer DVRs with 320-500GB.  I expect this to happen before the year (2009) is out.  But until then, it is a bit disingenuous to suggest that higher capacity DVRs are not available for FiOS.  Verizon allows customers to buy and use their own HDTV DVR with expansion, just as DirecTV customers can pay to get their own DVR with expansion.  Many customers are doing just that with the TivoHD or a Dell Vista Media Center PC.

 

The TivoHD completely replaces the Verizon DVR and directly supports all FiOS SD and HD channels.  It does require a subscription ($12.99/mo, $129/yr, or $399 lifetime), but you do not need to pay any STB or DVR fees to Verizon to use it.   The TivoHD does not connect to another box; it only requires one M-CARD ($3.99/mo) from Verizon -- inserted into the card slot in the front -- to support all FiOS channels on both of its tuners.  M-CARDs are currently available in at least the following markets: Delaware; Dallas, TX, Portland, OR; Seattle, WA; Long Island, NY; and Washington Metro (N.VA/MD, with most remaining markets slated to get them over the next few months.  If M-CARDs are not yet available, two of the older S-CARDs are required.

 

The standard TivoHD can now be had for $208 shipped (with coupon code AFLTVO208) -- about the same price as a DirecTV DVR.   This standard model includes a small 160GB drive, but it supports internal drive upgrades and external eSATA expansion.  An user can upgrade the unit with a 500GB DVR drive for about $60, while an upgrade to a 1TB drive costs about $100.  TiVo also sells a model called the "TivoHD XL" that comes pre-equipped with a 1TB drive (160+ HD hours); this sells at Amazon for $498.

 

Aside from internal and external storage expansion, the main advantages of the TivoHD are better usability and reliability, thanks to superior guide data.  The TivoHD does not use the guide data supplied by Verizon; every TiVo downloads guide data from its own servers using the ethernet connection (or wireless adapter).   The TivoHD also offers a number features not available on the standard FiOS DVR software, including the ability to a) autorecord all programs matching certain criteria; b) completely delete channels you do not watch from the guide, c) download all SD and HD recordings from DVR to your computer for viewing or burning to DVD, d) direct YouTube access, and e) support for Netflix streaming.

 

The main disadvantage of a TivoHD is that it cannot support FiOS VOD.  Only Verizon's own Motorola boxes can support FiOS VOD.  If you want access to VOD, you'll still have to rent a Verizon box.  Massive storage (160+ HD hours with a 1TB drive) does offset some of the need for VOD, however.

 

 

TiVo Functionality Screenshots

 

Recorded list

Separate Recorded List for children

 

Season passes (series recordings)

To Do List

Wishlists (autorecord content regardless of date, time, and channel using boolean search)


Remove Channels from Guide
Program Guide: Grid style
Program Guide: Tivo style

 

Plug and play eSATA (external drive) expansion

 

Remote scheduling using mobile phone

 

Download SD and HD recordings from the DVR using any web browser
Automatically download certain series to your computer
Automatically remove commercials from downloaded recordings
Burn commercial-free to DVD with Dolby Digital 5.1.

 

Netflix on TiVo

Browse videos on a PC

Automatically transfer videos from PC to TiVo

Access and play music on a PC

 

Cool TiVo application for MacOSX users

Message Edited by KenAF on 12-30-2008 12:40 AM
If you are the original poster (OP) and your issue is solved, please remember to click the "Solution?" button so that others can more easily find it.
speedo123
Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 79
Registered: ‎08-11-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 28 of 53
(7,811 Views)

KenAF wrote:
In another thread, I noted that Motorola charged a ridiculous premium for the 120GB vs 160GB models a few years ago.

More than 2/3 of all DVRs deployed by cable companies in the United States are Motorola DVRs.  Can you guess how many have a >160GB hard drive?  Zero, zilch, nada.  Can you guess how many support eSATA expansion?   Zero, zilch, nada.

 

Every Motorola DVR available to customers in the United States, regardless of provider, features a maximum internal size of 160GB with no functional eSATA expansion.  There are unconfirmed reports of a 320GB model being available, but for whatever reason, not a single cable provider has purchased or deployed it.  Either it isn't available yet, or it isn't available at a reasonable cost.

 

Suppose for a moment that a Motorola DVR with a 320GB drive is actually available, albeit at a substantial premium.  Do you think Verizon wants to offer a 320GB DVR for $25-30/mo when the competition offers a 160GB DVR for $12-16/mo?  Generally, cable providers want to stick with one model at one price to simplify installs and minimize confusion for both installers and end-users.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

KenAF - What I'm suggesting is that with the way the price of large hard drives has come down so drastically, there's no reason that there should be a huge difference in price for a new DVR wirh a reasonably sized drive.  They should probably cost less than what the 160G units did when they came out a few years ago.  And even if Verizon did HAVE to charge $25 - $30 for a larger capacity unit (while still offering the cheaper unit), I'm sure there are people who would want it.

 

 _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

KenAF wrote:

As far as external drive support, it must work reliably with encryption / DRM so it is acceptable to content providers.  Unconfirmed reports from the past suggest that Motorola has not been able to make eSATA drive expansion work reliably with DRM.   Users won't tolerate drive expansion if it causes the Motorola DVR to crash constantly.  Even DirecTV couldn't make traditional eSATA expansion work reliably, so they took a different approach; when you add a eSATA drive to DirecTV DVR, it completely takes the place of the internal drive, rather than splitting every recording across both the internal and external drive.  Perhaps Motorola should look into that.

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Should look into that?!  They should have done it years ago!  (Throw in the GM, Chrysler, Ford reference again!)

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

KenAF wrote: 

There are no cable providers that currently offer Motorola or SA DVRs with larger drives than Verizon.  Brighthouse, Cablevision, Charter, Comcast, Cox, and Time Warner all use DVRs with a maximum of 160GB internal.  Some of these providers use Scientific Atlanta DVRs in select markets, which provide unofficial support for eSATA expansion today.  In two test markets, Comcast does allow users to purchase their own Panasonic True2WAY DVR with a 250GB drive for ~$400(?).

 

Dish Network offers 320GB (ViP622) and 500GB (ViP722) DVRs.  DirecTV offers 320GB (HR20/21/22) and just released a 500GB (HR23) DVR.  DirecTV charges existing customers a $199 fee up-front to get a DVR, plus a $5.99/mo DVR fee to use it, plus another $5.00/mo if they have a second receiver in their home.  DirecTV also requires that any customer activating a DVR extend their service commitment by 1-2 years.  The DirecTV DVR must be returned, with no refund, when the user cancels service; if the DVR fails, the user is responsible for buying their own replacement.  This is clearly a different business model than used by FiOS; FiOS charges $15.99 to use their DVR, but it has no upfront fee, no commitment, and they'll replace it for free if it goes bad.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Your info appears to be a little off here.  I purchased two Samsung DVRs through eBay for about $50 each, bought two 320GB hard drives for $60 each and installed them in the Samsung units.  Added a modified operating system (off the internet) and got new access cards for the units from DirecTV.  DirecTV added these units to my package (in place of their units, so not really an additional charge) with no requirement for an extended contract.  However, I had seen on a DirecTV forum that some people in other areas did have problems with adding units without signing a long term contract.  So, it might depend on which office you're dealing with, what type of deal you can get.

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

KenAF wrote:

Now, the best solution for most customers would be for Verizon to offer a 320GB or 500GB DVR.  I expect Verizon to be among the first cable companies to offer DVRs with 320-500GB.  I expect this to happen before the year (2009) is out.  But until then, it is a bit disingenuous to suggest that higher capacity DVRs are not available for FiOS.  Verizon allows customers to buy and use their own HDTV DVR with expansion, just as DirecTV customers can pay to get their own DVR with expansion.  Many customers are doing just that with the TivoHD or a Dell Vista Media Center PC.


_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Good to hear, but there's no reason that it should take another year for these larger units to be available.  Again, it appears Verizon made a mistake going with Motorola equipment if this is the best they can do.

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

KenAF wrote: 

The TivoHD completely replaces the Verizon DVR and directly supports all FiOS SD and HD channels.  It does require a subscription ($12.99/mo, $129/yr, or $399 lifetime), but you do not need to pay any STB or DVR fees to Verizon to use it.   The TivoHD does not connect to another box; it only requires one M-CARD ($3.99/mo) from Verizon -- inserted into the card slot in the front -- to support all FiOS channels on both of its tuners.  M-CARDs are currently available in at least the following markets: Delaware; Dallas, TX, Portland, OR; Seattle, WA; Long Island, NY; and Washington Metro (N.VA/MD, with most remaining markets slated to get them over the next few months.  If M-CARDs are not yet available, two of the older S-CARDs are required.

 

The standard TivoHD can now be had for $208 shipped (with coupon code AFLTVO208) -- about the same price as a DirecTV DVR.   This standard model includes a small 160GB drive, but it supports internal drive upgrades and external eSATA expansion.  An user can upgrade the unit with a 500GB DVR drive for about $60, while an upgrade to a 1TB drive costs about $100.  TiVo also sells a model called the "TivoHD XL" that comes pre-equipped with a 1TB drive (160+ HD hours); this sells at Amazon for $498.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

So as said, equipment and operating systems that can use larger drives are presently available.  It can't be that difficult for Motorola/Verizon to supply its customers with such equipment in a reasonable period of time (not the end of 2009!).

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

KenAF wrote:

Aside from internal and external storage expansion, the main advantages of the TivoHD are better usability and reliability, thanks to superior guide data.  The TivoHD does not use the guide data supplied by Verizon; every TiVo downloads guide data from its own servers using the ethernet connection (or wireless adapter).   The TivoHD also offers a number features not available on the standard FiOS DVR software, including the ability to a) autorecord all programs matching certain criteria; b) completely delete channels you do not watch from the guide, c) download all SD and HD recordings from DVR to your computer for viewing or burning to DVD, d) direct YouTube access, and e) support for Netflix streaming.

 

The main disadvantage of a TivoHD is that it cannot support FiOS VOD.  Only Verizon's own Motorola boxes can support FiOS VOD.  If you want access to VOD, you'll still have to rent a Verizon box.  Massive storage (160+ HD hours with a 1TB drive) does offset some of the need for VOD, however.

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Having used the DirecTV version of the TiVo operating system, I know the advantages are really good.  You did leave out one other very nice feature Verizon doesn't offer - A multi-room feature that allows you to view what's recorded on any of your DVRs in any room on your other equipment, DVRs included (and at no additional cost).  Verizon's multi room feature only allows you to view what's recorded on the Home Media DVR, but only on set top boxes, not other DVRs, and also costs an additional $4/mo.  And many of Verizon's sales people don't know this.  I was sold the Home Media DVR for the living room with a regular DVR for the bedroom and told I would be able to view the LR recordings in the BR.  After installation, when it didn't work, the installer informed me that the feature only works with STBs, not other DVRs.

 

In my opinion, the "main disadvantage" of no VOD is not much of one (for me anyway).  I've had FIOS for over 6 months and, although I've gone through the VOD listings several times, I've never used it (not even the free listings), so certainly won't miss it if I switch to TiVo equipment. 

 

 

P.S:  Sorry for the mishmash of text here.  I couldn't figure out how you managed to split up my message so nicely in your post. ???

 

KenAF
Silver Contributor IV
Silver Contributor IV
Posts: 585
Registered: ‎10-22-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 29 of 53
(7,756 Views)

speedo123 wrote:

KenAF - What I'm suggesting is that with the way the price of large hard drives has come down so drastically, there's no reason that there should be a huge difference in price for a new DVR wirh a reasonably sized drive.  They should probably cost less than what the 160G units did when they came out a few years ago.  And even if Verizon did HAVE to charge $25 - $30 for a larger capacity unit (while still offering the cheaper unit), I'm sure there are people who would want it.


You assume that the actual cost correlates 1:1 with the price of the DVR.  That is almost certainly not the case.  If Verizon or Comcast could purchase 320GB DVRs for the actual difference in cost of the hard drives, or anything close to it, I guarantee you they would do it.

 

Motorola specifically codes every DVR's firmware to support the maximum capacity of the SKU.  This prevents their customers (cable companies) from upgrading the units themselves.  This forces customers to pay Motorola's price for the capacity they want.

 

Consider the situation from Motorola's perspective.  They must know that eventually customers will demand DVRs with higher capacity.  That means they can either force cable providers to pay a substantial premium now, or they can ultimately force the provider to replace all their 160GB DVRs with larger models in the future (planned obsolescence).

 

At the moment, there isn't much competition in this space to keep prices down.  A provider that uses Motorola equipment can't just switch to SA boxes overnight, because that's a completely different hardware, software, and support/infrastructure platform.

 


speedo123 wrote:

Your info appears to be a little off here.  I purchased two Samsung DVRs through eBay for about $50 each, bought two 320GB hard drives for $60 each and installed them in the Samsung units.  Added a modified operating system (off the internet) and got new access cards for the units from DirecTV.  DirecTV added these units to my package (in place of their units, so not really an additional charge) with no requirement for an extended contract.


This policy is rather new, as is the policy about DirecTV retaining ownership of all equipment.  The only HDTV DVRs now sold for DirecTV are the HR2x.  If you buy a HR2x, a new commitment is required upon activation.

 


speedo123 wrote:

Good to hear, but there's no reason that it should take another year for these larger units to be available.  Again, it appears Verizon made a mistake going with Motorola equipment if this is the best they can do.


The only alternative was Scientific Atlanta, which has the same internal drive limitations.  No SA DVR is deployed with >160GB, but obviously they do now have the advantage of functional eSATA support.

 

Verizon explored the possibility of adopting SA boxes late in 2006 / early 2007.  Ultimately, they decided against it.  I don't know all the reasons, but I do know that those boxes use a completely different hardware and software platform, and would have required a substantial rewrite of the IMG software.  By that time, Verizon already had tens of thousands of Motorola DVRs in the field --- I doubt they wanted to maintain two completely separate versions of their software.

 

Note all Motorola DVRs, including the QIP6416 and QIP7216, share the same basic Broadcom DVR architecture.  Most other DVRs -- in fact, almost every cable and satellite DVR on the market, aside from the SA boxes -- are designed around Broadcom DVR CPUs like the BCM7038/BCM740x.

 


speedo123 wrote:

So as said, equipment and operating systems that can use larger drives are presently available.  It can't be that difficult for Motorola/Verizon to supply its customers with such equipment in a reasonable period of time (not the end of 2009!).


DirecTV supplies the software and sets the design specifications for their boxes, and then has Samsung, LG, and others bid for the contract to supply hundreds of thousands (even millions) of units.   DirecTV is able to create competition in this way because they alone sell millions of DVRs each year.  Verizon is trying to do the same thing and reportedly did a RFP last year, to take bids from different CE manufacturers on a multi-billion dollar contract for next-generation STBs and DVRs.  It will probably be another year before we see the outcome of that.

 

According to DirecTV's own financial disclosures this year, they paid approximately $450 for each HR20 DVR.   DirecTV also said they were able to reduce the cost to $250 with the debut of the HR21/HR22 earlier this year.  Without the volume and competitive bidding, there's almost certainly no way they could have hit that price target for a 320GB DVR last summer.  Verizon is believed to be paying over $400 for each Motorola QIP6416 DVR with 160GB.

 

speedo123 wrote:

Having used the DirecTV version of the TiVo operating system, I know the advantages are really good.  You did leave out one other very nice feature Verizon doesn't offer - A multi-room feature that allows you to view what's recorded on any of your DVRs in any room on your other equipment, DVRs included (and at no additional cost).  Verizon's multi room feature only allows you to view what's recorded on the Home Media DVR, but only on set top boxes, not other DVRs, and also costs an additional $4/mo.  And many of Verizon's sales people don't know this.  I was sold the Home Media DVR for the living room with a regular DVR for the bedroom and told I would be able to view the LR recordings in the BR


True.

 

I consider that a bit of a wash, though.  TiVo lets you view your recordings on other Tivo DVRs.  But they don't have any sort of cheap STB you can buy, so you've got to get another TivoHD for $207 (plus $9.99/mo, $99/yr, or $299 lifetime) if you want multi-room with TiVo.  If TiVo had some sort of $99 STB available that could provide multiroom access to all recordings without a monthly fee, it'd be a no brainer.

 


speedo123 wrote:

P.S:  Sorry for the mishmash of text here.  I couldn't figure out how you managed to split up my message so nicely in your post. ???


To indent and unindent text, you can use the <- and -> buttons on the toolbar.

Message Edited by KenAF on 12-30-2008 05:34 PM
If you are the original poster (OP) and your issue is solved, please remember to click the "Solution?" button so that others can more easily find it.
speedo123
Bronze Contributor II
Bronze Contributor II
Posts: 79
Registered: ‎08-11-2008

Re: The MOTO QIC-6416 DVR STB has PORTS. Why can't we USE them???

Message 30 of 53
(7,722 Views)

Thanks for the info.  It certainly clarifies why there's been such a time delay in getting units with larger hard drives and that it is mostly not Verizon's doing (or lack of doing).  But it does show that once again, a manufacturer has decided to ignore it's customers' needs and desires for an immediate profit return.  Short term profits over long term planning. We've seen how well that tactic has worked for other US manufactures and our economy in general!  Appears that Motorola has decided to rape the customer now instead of building long-term customer loyalty.  Pretty much goes along with my thoughts that Verizon made a major mistake in picking Motorola as it's equipment supplier.

 


KenAF wrote:

 

DirecTV supplies the software and sets the design specifications for their boxes, and then has Samsung, LG, and others bid for the contract to supply hundreds of thousands (even millions) of units.   DirecTV is able to create competition in this way because they alone sell millions of DVRs each year.  Verizon is trying to do the same thing and reportedly did a RFP last year, to take bids from different CE manufacturers on a multi-billion dollar contract for next-generation STBs and DVRs.  It will probably be another year before we see the outcome of that.

 

According to DirecTV's own financial disclosures this year, they paid approximately $450 for each HR20 DVR.   DirecTV also said they were able to reduce the cost to $250 with the debut of the HR21/HR22 earlier this year.  Without the volume and competitive bidding, there's almost certainly no way they could have hit that price target for a 320GB DVR last summer.  Verizon is believed to be paying over $400 for each Motorola QIP6416 DVR with 160GB.


Good to know that this is really being addressed.  And let's hope Motorola isn't the winner.  A thought - If it's true that TiVo is really loosing money on every DVR it sells, maybe it's the perfect time for Verizon to talk to them about supplying it's equipment and guide for FIOS, as they did at one time with DirecTV.  The major increase in units sold should allow them to reduce costs and thus make money on them.  Verizon would benefit from being able to offer an expandable DVR, with an operating system free of the glitches its present system has and a replacement Guide that's accurate.  TiVo benefits from a larger installed base and equipment profitability.  A win-win situation for both companies.  And with the state of the economy, one would think that it should be a bit easier for each to compromise in working out a mutually beneficial contract.

 

 


KenAF wrote: 

To indent and unindent text, you can use the <- and -> buttons on the toolbar.


Hmm... I don't seem to have those buttons on my tool bar, but I got a little better at text manipulation this post.

 

 

How-To Videos
 
The following videos were produced by users like you!
   
Videos are subject to the Verizon Fios Community Terms of Service and User Guidelines and contains content that is not created by Verizon.
Have a spare Fios-G1100?Learn how to bridge it into your network
Get Started


Covid19

Browse Categories
Categories:
Posts

Verizon Troubleshooters
Unable to find your answer here? Try searching Verizon Troubleshooters for more options.
Modal Dialogue Title